the branch of mechanics that deals with the motion of air and other gases and with the effects of such motion on bodies in the medium.
Compare (def 1).
Contemporary Examples

Americans built a fighter, the P-51, with aerodynamics that seemed to defy the laws of physics.
The Nerds Who Won World War II Marc Wortman February 6, 2013

Spoiler: it has something to do with the aerodynamics of the ball.
Can You Answer These 10 Oddball Job Interview Questions Asked at America’s Top Tech Companies? Brian Ries January 16, 2014

After all, aerodynamics and electrodynamics are just theories, too.
Ask the Big Questions Deepak Chopra, Leonard Mlodinow October 25, 2011

Historical Examples

We had classes everyday on engines, aerodynamics, and air craft identification.
The Biography of a Rabbit Roy Benson

It was about this time that he began his experiments in “aerodynamics.”
The Age of Invention Holland Thompson

The development of a new forage harvester based on principles of aerodynamics uncovered by missile engineers is another example.
The Practical Values of Space Exploration Committee on Science and Astronautics

He knew very little about the laws of aerodynamics, about stress and strain and factors of safety.
The Romance of Aircraft Lawrence Yard Smith

(functioning as sing) the study of the dynamics of gases, esp of the forces acting on a body passing through air Compare aerostatics (sense 1)

1837, from aero- “air” + dynamics.
The study of the movement of air and other gases. Aerodynamics includes the study of the interactions of air with moving objects, such as airplanes, and of the effects of moving air on stationary objects, such as buildings.

Our Living Language : The two primary forces in aerodynamics are lift and drag. Lift refers to (usually upward) forces perpendicular to the direction of motion of an object traveling through the air. For example, airplane wings are designed so that their movement through the air creates an area of low pressure above the wing and an area of high pressure beneath it; the pressure difference produces the lift needed for flight. This effect is typical of airfoil design. Drag forces are parallel and opposite to the object’s direction of motion and are caused largely by friction. Large wings can create a significant amount of lift, but they do so with the expense of generating a great deal of drag. Spoilers that are extended on airplane wings upon the vehicle’s landing exploit this tradeoff by making the wings capable of high lift even at low speeds; low landing speeds then still provide enough lift for a gentle touchdown. Aeronautical engineers need to take into account such factors as the speed and altitude at which their designs will fly (lower air pressures at high altitudes reduce both lift and drag) in order to optimally balance lift and drag in varying conditions.

The branch of science devoted to the study of the flow of gases around solid objects. It is especially important in the design of cars and airplanes, which move through the air.

Note: A vehicle that has been built to minimize friction with the air is said to be aerodynamically designed.


Read Also:

  • Aerodynamic trajectory

    the path of an object, as a rocket, when the air is dense enough to modify the course of flight significantly.

  • Aerodynamic wave drag

    the restraining force on a supersonic aircraft caused by shock waves.

  • Aerodyne

    any heavier-than-air aircraft deriving its lift mainly from aerodynamic forces. noun any heavier-than-air machine, such as an aircraft, that derives the greater part of its lift from aerodynamic forces

  • Aeroelastic

    of, relating to, or resulting from aerodynamic forces: tests to determine the aeroelastic stress on a building. deformable by aerodynamic forces.

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