Afanc



n.

cattle-devouring aquatic monster in Celtic countries, from Celtic *abankos “water-creature,” from *ab- “water” (cf. Welsh afon, Breton aven “river,” Latin amnis “stream, river,” which is of Italo-Celtic origin).
Historical Examples

Then I wondered p. 283whether the pool before me had been the haunt of the afanc, considered both as crocodile and beaver.
Wild Wales George Borrow

Moreover, have we not the voice of tradition that the afanc was something monstrous?
Wild Wales George Borrow

Then I wondered whether the pool before me had been the haunt of the afanc, considered both as crocodile and beaver.
Wild Wales George Borrow

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    from, at, or to a distance; far away (usually followed by off): He saw the castle afar off. from afar, from a long way off: The princess saw him riding toward her from afar. a member of a nomadic Muslim people living in Eritrea, Djibouti, and northern Ethiopia. the Northern Cushitic language spoken by the […]

  • Afar off

    from, at, or to a distance; far away (usually followed by off): He saw the castle afar off. from afar, from a long way off: The princess saw him riding toward her from afar. adverb at, from, or to a great distance noun a great distance (esp in the phrase from afar) adv. contraction of […]



  • Afara

    a member of a nomadic Muslim people living in Eritrea, Djibouti, and northern Ethiopia. the Northern Cushitic language spoken by the Afars. adverb at, from, or to a great distance noun a great distance (esp in the phrase from afar) adv. contraction of Middle English of feor (late 12c.), on ferr (c.1300), from Old English […]

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    French Territory of the, a former name of (def 1).



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