Agalactosis



agalactosis

agalactosis a·gal·ac·to·sis (ā-gāl’ək-tō’sĭs, ə-gāl’-)
n.
See agalactia.

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  • Agalite

    a fibrous variety of talc. Historical Examples agalite and talc, which are silicates of magnesia, are also used. From Paper-mill to Pressroom William Bond Wheelwright Other silicates of magnesia used for paper-making are agalite and asbestine, the latter being a finely ground asbestos. The Manufacture of Paper Robert Walter Sindall

  • Agalloch

    the fragrant, resinous wood of an East Indian tree, Aquilaria agallocha, of the mezereum family, used as incense in the Orient. Historical Examples Ea′gle-wood, another name for agalloch or calambac; Spread′-ea′gle (see Spread). Chambers’s Twentieth Century Dictionary (part 2 of 4: E-M) Various Aloes: the fragrant resin of the agalloch or lign-aloe of Scripture. The […]



  • Agalwood

    the fragrant, resinous wood of an East Indian tree, Aquilaria agallocha, of the mezereum family, used as incense in the Orient. noun another name for eaglewood

  • Agama

    any of numerous agamid lizards of the genus Agama, many of which are brilliantly colored and have the ability to change the color of the skin. any of the Tantric writings. Historical Examples The brilliantly coloured red and blue lizard (agama colonorum) is found in the coast region of eastern Liberia. Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, […]



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