Aggravation



an increase in intensity, seriousness, or severity; act of making worse:
an aggravation of pain.
the state of being .
something that causes an increase in intensity, degree, or severity.
annoyance; exasperation:
Johnny causes me so much aggravation!
a source or cause of annoyance or exasperation:
Johnny’s such an aggravation to her!
Contemporary Examples

Some later claimed that a cop shook a can of mace, an uncalled for act of aggravation, one man said.
Ferguson Protesters Harass Black Police, Call for Darren Wilson’s Death Justin Glawe November 20, 2014

I could save myself a lot of time and aggravation if I just limited my listening to megastars and their hyped hits.
The Best Albums of 2014 Ted Gioia December 12, 2014

We have worked too hard to give it up now or debt and aggravation.
Why I Choose to Be Child-Free: Readers Share Their Stories Harry Siegel February 26, 2013

Historical Examples

The day brought no aggravation of the symptoms; again the night was quiet.
The Book-Hunter John Hill Burton

It isn’t the girl, you know, it’s—it’s the aggravation of it.
Punch or the London Charivari, Vol. 147, December 23, 1914 Various

Subacute exacerbations occur from time to time, with fever and aggravation of the local symptoms and implication of other joints.
Manual of Surgery Alexis Thomson and Alexander Miles

Just worn out with the work, and the worry and the aggravation, that’s all.
Gigolo Edna Ferber

That aggravation entirely overpowered Edward Rider’s self-control.
The Doctor’s Family Mrs. (Margaret) Oliphant

He meant that the Baron was free from an aggravation; he said that he lacked a consolation.
The King’s Mirror Anthony Hope

The presence of a spectre in the horizon is an aggravation of solitude.
The Man Who Laughs Victor Hugo

n.

late 15c., from Middle French aggravation, from Late Latin aggravationem (nominative aggravatio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin aggravare “make heavier,” figuratively “to embarrass further, increase in oppressiveness,” from ad “to” (see ad-) + gravare “weigh down,” from gravis “heavy” (see grave (adj.)). Oldest sense is “increasing in gravity or seriousness;” that of “irritation” is from 1610s.

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  • Aggravator

    to make worse or more severe; intensify, as anything evil, disorderly, or troublesome: to aggravate a grievance; to aggravate an illness. to annoy; irritate; exasperate: His questions aggravate her. to cause to become irritated or inflamed: The child’s constant scratching aggravated the rash. Historical Examples So it would appear that even champagne is a mitigant, […]

  • Aggregable

    formed by the conjunction or collection of particulars into a whole mass or sum; total; combined: the aggregate amount of indebtedness. Botany. (of a flower) formed of florets collected in a dense cluster but not cohering, as the daisy. (of a fruit) composed of a cluster of carpels belonging to the same flower, as the […]



  • Aggregate

    formed by the conjunction or collection of particulars into a whole mass or sum; total; combined: the aggregate amount of indebtedness. Botany. (of a flower) formed of florets collected in a dense cluster but not cohering, as the daisy. (of a fruit) composed of a cluster of carpels belonging to the same flower, as the […]

  • Aggregate fruit

    aggregate fruit aggregate fruit (āg’rĭ-gĭt) A fruit, such as a raspberry or a strawberry, that consists of multiple ripened ovaries of a single flower, borne together on a common receptacle. Compare accessory fruit, multiple fruit, simple fruit.



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