Aggregating



formed by the conjunction or collection of particulars into a whole mass or sum; total; combined:
the aggregate amount of indebtedness.
Botany.

(of a flower) formed of florets collected in a dense cluster but not cohering, as the daisy.
(of a fruit) composed of a cluster of carpels belonging to the same flower, as the raspberry.

Geology. (of a rock) consisting of a mixture of minerals separable by mechanical means.
a sum, mass, or assemblage of particulars; a total or gross amount:
the aggregate of all past experience.
a cluster of soil granules not larger than a small crumb.
any of various loose, particulate materials, as sand, gravel, or pebbles, added to a cementing agent to make concrete, plaster, etc.
Mathematics, (def 92).
to bring together; collect into one sum, mass, or body.
to amount to (the number of):
The guns captured will aggregate five or six hundred.
to combine and form a collection or mass.
in the aggregate, taken or considered as a whole:
In the aggregate, our losses have been relatively small.
Contemporary Examples

How does aggregating non-corrupt contributions render them corrupt?
The Court Case That Pivots on What ‘Corrupt’ Really Means Lawrence Lessig September 25, 2013

But there is InTrade, an online betting ring that does a decent job of aggregating conventional wisdom.
Romney’s Intrade Stock: Ready for a Bull Run? Alex Klein August 13, 2012

Historical Examples

The holiday in the Isle of Man had resulted in two quarto note books, aggregating ninety-six pages, closely written in pencil.
The Life of George Borrow Herbert Jenkins

In 1908 there were 21 public parks, aggregating more than 1335 acres.
Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 13, Slice 1 Various

His street-car investments, aggregating fifty thousand, were paying six per cent.
The Financier Theodore Dreiser

This is particularly the case with the family debts, often aggregating a large sum.
Village Life in China Arthur H. Smith

It meets the requisitions of the philosophical understanding, as well as of the shaping and aggregating fancy.
The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 13, No. 76, February, 1864 Various

Ten farms, aggregating 258 acres, are operated by Negroes as cash tenants.
Twentieth Century Negro Literature Various

Thus, in 1898 there were six entries, aggregating five hundred dollars.
The Confession Mary Roberts Rinehart

In this there were employed five German army corps, aggregating nearly 300,000 men.
The Battles in Flanders From Ypres to Neuve Chapelle Edmund Dane

adjective (ˈæɡrɪɡɪt; -ˌɡeɪt)
formed of separate units collected into a whole; collective; corporate
(of fruits and flowers) composed of a dense cluster of carpels or florets
noun (ˈæɡrɪɡɪt; -ˌɡeɪt)
a sum or assemblage of many separate units; sum total
(geology) a rock, such as granite, consisting of a mixture of minerals
the sand and stone mixed with cement and water to make concrete
a group of closely related biotypes produced by apomixis, such as brambles, which are the Rubus fruticosus aggregate
in the aggregate, taken as a whole
verb (ˈæɡrɪˌɡeɪt)
to combine or be combined into a body, etc
(transitive) to amount to (a number)
adj.

c.1400, from Latin aggregatus “associated,” literally “united in a flock,” past participle of aggregare “add to (a flock), lead to a flock, bring together (in a flock),” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + gregare “herd” (see gregarious).
v.

c.1400, from Latin aggregatum, neuter past participle of aggregare (see aggregate (adj.)). Related: Aggregated; aggregating.
n.

“number of persons, things, etc., regarded as a unit,” early 15c., from noun use of Latin adjective aggregatum, neuter of aggregatus (see aggregate (adj.)).

aggregate ag·gre·gate (āg’rĭ-gĭt)
adj.
Crowded or massed into a dense cluster. n.
A total considered with reference to its constituent parts; a gross amount in a mass or cluster. v. ag·gre·gat·ed, ag·gre·gat·ing, ag·gre·gates (-gāt’)
To gather into a mass, sum, or whole.

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