Aggregatory



formed by the conjunction or collection of particulars into a whole mass or sum; total; combined:
the aggregate amount of indebtedness.
Botany.

(of a flower) formed of florets collected in a dense cluster but not cohering, as the daisy.
(of a fruit) composed of a cluster of carpels belonging to the same flower, as the raspberry.

Geology. (of a rock) consisting of a mixture of minerals separable by mechanical means.
a sum, mass, or assemblage of particulars; a total or gross amount:
the aggregate of all past experience.
a cluster of soil granules not larger than a small crumb.
any of various loose, particulate materials, as sand, gravel, or pebbles, added to a cementing agent to make concrete, plaster, etc.
Mathematics, (def 92).
to bring together; collect into one sum, mass, or body.
to amount to (the number of):
The guns captured will aggregate five or six hundred.
to combine and form a collection or mass.
in the aggregate, taken or considered as a whole:
In the aggregate, our losses have been relatively small.
adjective (ˈæɡrɪɡɪt; -ˌɡeɪt)
formed of separate units collected into a whole; collective; corporate
(of fruits and flowers) composed of a dense cluster of carpels or florets
noun (ˈæɡrɪɡɪt; -ˌɡeɪt)
a sum or assemblage of many separate units; sum total
(geology) a rock, such as granite, consisting of a mixture of minerals
the sand and stone mixed with cement and water to make concrete
a group of closely related biotypes produced by apomixis, such as brambles, which are the Rubus fruticosus aggregate
in the aggregate, taken as a whole
verb (ˈæɡrɪˌɡeɪt)
to combine or be combined into a body, etc
(transitive) to amount to (a number)
adj.

c.1400, from Latin aggregatus “associated,” literally “united in a flock,” past participle of aggregare “add to (a flock), lead to a flock, bring together (in a flock),” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + gregare “herd” (see gregarious).
v.

c.1400, from Latin aggregatum, neuter past participle of aggregare (see aggregate (adj.)). Related: Aggregated; aggregating.
n.

“number of persons, things, etc., regarded as a unit,” early 15c., from noun use of Latin adjective aggregatum, neuter of aggregatus (see aggregate (adj.)).

aggregate ag·gre·gate (āg’rĭ-gĭt)
adj.
Crowded or massed into a dense cluster. n.
A total considered with reference to its constituent parts; a gross amount in a mass or cluster. v. ag·gre·gat·ed, ag·gre·gat·ing, ag·gre·gates (-gāt’)
To gather into a mass, sum, or whole.

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