Agitated



excited; disturbed.
to move or force into violent, irregular action:
The hurricane winds agitated the sea.
to shake or move briskly:
The machine agitated the mixture.
to move to and fro; impart regular motion to.
to disturb or excite emotionally; arouse; perturb:
a crowd agitated to a frenzy by impassioned oratory; a man agitated by disquieting news.
to call attention to by speech or writing; discuss; debate:
to agitate the question.
to consider on all sides; revolve in the mind; plan.
to arouse or attempt to arouse public interest and support, as in some political or social cause or theory:
to agitate for the repeal of a tax.
Contemporary Examples

After years of buyouts, layoffs, and holding the line on costs, employees are agitated over potential changes to the pension plan.
Mark Thompson, New York Times’ Latest CEO, Faces Rocky Start Daniel Gross, Michael Moynihan October 25, 2012

The meeting wound down shortly afterward but not before an agitated President Reagan warned once more against leaks.
How the Reagan White House Bungled Its Response to Iran-Contra Revelations Malcolm Byrne November 2, 2014

As I left with an agitated employer, Kemp encouraged me to reach out to him if I wanted to get to know him better.
Jack Kemp 2016: The Case for Paul Ryan Ron Christie December 12, 2013

At first, the doctors write, the villagers were “fearful and agitated,” lacking the basic necessities needed to survive.
1976 Vs. Today: Ebola’s Terrifying Evolution Abby Haglage September 9, 2014

He was calm but every once in a while would get agitated and say, ‘Have the cops been here, have the cops been here?’
Is Chasen’s Killer Still Out There? Claire Martin, Kate Aurthur December 2, 2010

Historical Examples

I confess I was too agitated to catch every word that was spoken.
Burlesques William Makepeace Thackeray

I’m so agitated by recent events, that, that—indeed you must excuse me.
Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, No. 327 Various

So, during 1647 and 1648, the navy was agitated by dissensions.
A Short History of the Royal Navy 1217 to 1688 David Hannay

What shook the pillars of the Union when the Missouri question was agitated?
The Works of Whittier, Volume VII (of VII) John Greenleaf Whittier

Verily awe of man is like smoke, and quickly, when it is agitated, vanishes.
The Homilies of the Anglo-Saxon Church lfric

verb
(transitive) to excite, disturb, or trouble (a person, the mind, or feelings); worry
(transitive) to cause to move vigorously; shake, stir, or disturb
(intransitive; often foll by for or against) to attempt to stir up public opinion for or against something
(transitive) to discuss or debate in order to draw attention to or gain support for (a cause, etc): to agitate a political cause
adj.

1610s, “set in motion,” past participle adjective from agitate (v.). Meaning “disturbed” is from 1650s; that of “disturbed in mind” is from 1756. Meaning “kept constantly in public view” is from 1640s.
v.

1580s, “to disturb,” from Latin agitatus, past participle of agitare “to put in constant motion, drive onward, impel,” frequentative of agere “to move, drive” (see agitation). Literal sense of “move to and fro, shake” is from 1590s. Related: Agitated; agitating.

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  • Agitated depression

    a severe depression accompanied by constant restlessness. noun severe depression accompanied by extreme anxiety and agitation Also called agitated melancholia agitated depression ag·i·tat·ed depression (āj’ĭ-tā’tĭd) n. A form of depression characterized by restlessness and nervous activity.

  • Agitatedly

    excited; disturbed. Historical Examples “I do hope the cat will get along all right,” she said agitatedly. Jane Field Mary E. Wilkins Freeman I offered to inquire of the Captain: but she stopped me, agitatedly. Campaigns of a Non-Combatant, George Alfred Townsend “Mrs Crane”—began Isabel, agitatedly, but she was interrupted at once. Blind Policy George […]



  • Agitation

    the act or process of ; state of being : She left in great agitation. persistent urging of a political or social cause or theory before the public. Also called psychomotor agitation. psychological and physical restlessness, manifested by pacing, hand-wringing, or other activity, sometimes occurring as a symptom of severe depression, schizophrenia, or other mental […]

  • Agitational

    the act or process of ; state of being : She left in great agitation. persistent urging of a political or social cause or theory before the public. Also called psychomotor agitation. psychological and physical restlessness, manifested by pacing, hand-wringing, or other activity, sometimes occurring as a symptom of severe depression, schizophrenia, or other mental […]



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