Aim at



to position or direct (a firearm, ball, arrow, rocket, etc.) so that, on firing or release, the discharged projectile will hit a target or travel along a certain path.
to intend or direct for a particular effect or purpose:
to aim a satire at snobbery.
to point or direct a gun, punch, etc., toward:
He aimed at the target but missed it.
to strive; try (usually followed by to or at):
We aim to please. They aim at saving something every month.
to intend:
She aims to go tomorrow.
to direct efforts, as toward an object:
The satire aimed at modern greed.
Obsolete. to estimate; guess.
the act of aiming or directing anything at or toward a particular point or target.
the direction in which a weapon or missile is pointed; the line of sighting:
within the cannon’s aim.
the point intended to be hit; thing or person aimed at:
to miss one’s aim.
something intended or desired to be attained by one’s efforts; purpose:
whatever his aim in life may be.
Obsolete. conjecture; guess.
take aim, to sight a target:
to take aim and fire.
verb
to point (a weapon, missile, etc) or direct (a blow) at a particular person or object; level
(transitive) to direct (satire, criticism, etc) at a person, object, etc
(intransitive; foll by at or an infinitive) to propose or intend: we aim to leave early
(intransitive; often foll by at or for) to direct one’s efforts or strive (towards): to aim at better communications, to aim high
noun
the action of directing something at an object
the direction in which something is pointed; line of sighting (esp in the phrase to take aim)
the object at which something is aimed; target
intention; purpose
abbreviation
(in Britain) Alternative Investment Market
v.

early 14c., “to estimate, calculate,” also “to intend,” from Old French aesmer “value, rate; count, estimate,” from Latin aestimare “appraise” (see estimation); current meaning apparently developed from “esteem,” to “calculate,” to “calculate with a view to action” (c.1400), then to “direct a missile, a blow, etc.” (1570s). Related: Aimed; aiming.
n.

early 14c., “target;” late 14c., “guess;” from aim (v.). Meaning “action of aiming” is from early 15c. (to take aim, originally make aim); that of “thing intended, purpose” is from 1620s.
American Indian Movement
In addition to the idiom beginning with aim also see: take aim

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Aim to

    to position or direct (a firearm, ball, arrow, rocket, etc.) so that, on firing or release, the discharged projectile will hit a target or travel along a certain path. to intend or direct for a particular effect or purpose: to aim a satire at snobbery. to point or direct a gun, punch, etc., toward: He […]

  • Aimaco

    aimaco AIr MAterial COmmand compiler



  • Aimak

    one of the 18 largest regions into which the Mongolian People’s Republic is divided for administrative purposes. a clanlike group among Mongolian peoples.

  • Aimcrier

    noun an applauder, encourager; the person who cries “Aim!” to the archer



Disclaimer: Aim at definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.