All in a day’s work



Also, all in the day’s work.
Expected and normal, as in He said I had to finish these reports by five o’clock—all in the day’s work. This phrase is sometimes used as an ironic comment on an unpleasant but not abnormal situation. The expression possibly alludes to the nautical term day’s work, defined in 1789 as the reckoning of a ship’s course during the 24 hours from noon to noon. [ c. 1800 ]

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  • All in all

    the whole of (used in referring to quantity, extent, or duration): all the cake; all the way; all year. the whole number of (used in referring to individuals or particulars, taken collectively): all students. the greatest possible (used in referring to quality or degree): with all due respect; with all speed. every: all kinds; all […]

  • All in good time

    see: in good time



  • All in hand

    the whole of (used in referring to quantity, extent, or duration): all the cake; all the way; all year. the whole number of (used in referring to individuals or particulars, taken collectively): all students. the greatest possible (used in referring to quality or degree): with all due respect; with all speed. every: all kinds; all […]

  • All in one piece

    all in one piece adverb phrase Intact; unharmed: She came out of it in one piece Also, in one piece Entirely undamaged or unharmed, as in Given all the airport delays and bad weather, we were glad to arrive all in one piece, or She was relieved when he returned from Nepal in one piece. […]



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