Allen’s rule

allen’s rule
Allen’s rule
The principle holding that in a warm-blooded animal species having distinct geographic populations, the limbs, ears, and other appendages of the animals living in cold climates tend to be shorter than in animals of the same species living in warm climates. Shorter and more compact body parts have less surface area than elongated ones and thus radiate less body heat. Allen’s rule is named for the American zoologist Joel Allen (1838-1921). Compare Bergmann’s rule.


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