Allure



to attract or tempt by something flattering or desirable.
to fascinate; charm.
to be attractive or tempting.
fascination; charm; appeal.
.
a passageway, as the walk along one side of a cloister.
Contemporary Examples

Not even a mediocre film can erase the allure of the great romance of Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton.
The Liz and Dick Show Still Charms Even if ‘Liz & Dick’ Doesn’t Daphne Merkin November 24, 2012

But despite her allure, her assiduous assault on New York produced no results.
How Desiree Landed Her Gig Sandra McElwaine August 10, 2010

And Barbie and Ken’s allure goes beyond kitsch or nostalgia.
How Ken Won Barbie’s Heart Back Danielle Friedman February 13, 2011

He set a goal to work as an assistant to legendary allure creative director Polly Mellen, which he achieved.
MTV’s Mr. Nice Guy Enid Portuguez April 25, 2010

An archaeologist explains the allure—and the rationale of exploring—the blue planet.
This Week’s Hot Reads: June 18, 2012 Jimmy So June 17, 2012

Historical Examples

They allure and baffle us, as the smile on the lips of the Mona Lisa.
Visions and Revisions John Cowper Powys

Now it assembles the blossoms of a whole long year to bewilder and allure.
The Spenders Harry Leon Wilson

From the first he eschewed the facile trickeries and ostentations which allure the populace.
Tales of the Five Towns Arnold Bennett

Thus: in that by guile they allure the people to the lust of the flesh.
The Epistles of St. Peter and St. Jude Preached and Explained Martin Luther

Dolores smiled at his confusion, and in that smile was the allure of a Circe.
The Pirate Woman Aylward Edward Dingle

verb
(transitive) to entice or tempt (someone) to a person or place or to a course of action; attract
noun
attractiveness; appeal: the cottage’s allure was its isolation
v.

c.1400, from Anglo-French alurer, Old French aleurer “to attract, captivate; train a falcon to hunt,” from à “to” (see ad-) + loirre “falconer’s lure,” from a Frankish word (see lure), perhaps influenced by French allure “gait, way of walking.” Related: Allured; alluring. The noun is first attested 1540s; properly this sense is allurement.

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  • Allured

    to attract or tempt by something flattering or desirable. to fascinate; charm. to be attractive or tempting. fascination; charm; appeal. Historical Examples You would be astounded to learn how many ruined women are wives who have been allured to sin. Fighting the Traffic in Young Girls Various She was not allured, hardly tempted, by the […]

  • Allurement

    fascination; charm. the means of . the act or process of . Historical Examples How true was this dream of theirs gathering detail and allurement as it passed from sire to son! A Man for the Ages Irving Bacheller “If I give her to them, she will never be a widow,” was the allurement there. […]



  • Alluring

    very attractive or tempting; enticing; seductive. fascinating; charming. to attract or tempt by something flattering or desirable. to fascinate; charm. to be attractive or tempting. fascination; charm; appeal. Contemporary Examples Downtown darling Vena Cava showed off a structured collection, full of modern lines and alluring glimpses of skin. Fashion Takes a Bow The Daily Beast […]

  • Alluringly

    very attractive or tempting; enticing; seductive. fascinating; charming. Historical Examples The sun shone warm and bright; the chinook blew balmily and alluringly; the trail stretched before us dry and level. Lucy Maud Montgomery Short Stories, 1909 to 1922 Lucy Maud Montgomery Might their melodies not strike freshly and alluringly on the ear to-day? A Boswell […]



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