Amici curiae



a person, not a party to the litigation, who volunteers or is invited by the court to give advice upon some matter pending before it.
Historical Examples

Yet as amici curiae, we would have thought that that Tottenham Road carpet might have been kept out of Court.
Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 99, August 9, 1890. Various

noun (pl) amici curiae (æˈmiːkaɪ)
(law) a person not directly engaged in a case who advises the court

1610s, Latin, literally “friend of the court;” plural is amici curiae. From Latin amicus “friend,” related to amare “to love” (see Amy) + curia “court” (see curia).
amicus curiae [(uh-mee-kuhs kyoor-ee-eye)]

See friend of the court.

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    amicrobic amicrobic a·mi·cro·bic (ā’mī-krō’bĭk) adj. Not relating to or caused by microorganisms.

  • Amicus

    of, relating to, or representing an , a friend of the court: The church stated its official position in an amicus brief. a philanthropist. a friend to the last degree. Contemporary Examples It’s why this amicus brief is gaining signatures every day and why the party of individual freedom can give voice to gay equality. […]



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