Anaphora



Also called epanaphora. Rhetoric. repetition of a word or words at the beginning of two or more successive verses, clauses, or sentences.
Compare (def 1), .
Grammar. the use of a word as a regular grammatical substitute for a preceding word or group of words, as the use of it and do in I know it and he does too.
Compare .
(sometimes initial capital letter) Eastern Church.

the prayer of oblation and consecration in the Divine Liturgy during which the Eucharistic elements are offered.
the part of the ceremony during which the Eucharistic elements are offered as an oblation.

noun
(grammar) the use of a word such as a pronoun that has the same reference as a word previously used in the same discourse. In the sentence John wrote the essay in the library but Peter did it at home, both did and it are examples of anaphora Compare cataphora, exophoric
(rhetoric) the repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of successive clauses
n.

“repetition of a word or phrase in successive clauses,” 1580s, from Latin, from Greek anaphora “reference,” literally “a carrying back,” from anapherein “to carry back, to bring up,” from ana “back” (see ana-) + pherein “to bear” (see infer).

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  • Anaphoresis

    noun (chem) the movement of suspended charged particles towards the anode in an electric field

  • Anaphoria

    anaphoria anaphoria an·a·pho·ri·a (ān’ə-fôr’ē-ə) n. A tendency of resting eyes to turn upward. Also called anatropia.



  • Anaphoric

    referring back to or substituting for a preceding word or group of words: anaphoric reference. Historical Examples There is also another kind of winter dial, called the anaphoric and constructed in the following way. Ten Books on Architecture Vitruvius adjective of or relating to anaphorism adj. 1914, coined by Danish linguist Otto Jespersen (1860-1943) in […]

  • Anaphorically

    referring back to or substituting for a preceding word or group of words: anaphoric reference. adjective of or relating to anaphorism adj. 1914, coined by Danish linguist Otto Jespersen (1860-1943) in the grammatical sense; see anaphora + -ic. In the sentence, “Here are some apples; take one,” the one is anaphoric.



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