Anger



a strong feeling of displeasure and belligerence aroused by a wrong; wrath; ire.
Chiefly British Dialect. pain or smart, as of a sore.
Obsolete. grief; trouble.
to arouse anger or wrath in.
Chiefly British Dialect. to cause to smart; inflame.
to become :
He angers with little provocation.
Contemporary Examples

Running like a vein of gold through all of this fear and anger is love.
Why I Went From ‘Twilight’ to ‘A Better Life’ Chris Weitz June 20, 2011

The former are still nervous about the latter, and eager to avoid their anger.
Another Rebuke of the Tea Party? Jamelle Bouie December 16, 2013

Laura Richardson Sometimes political goodbyes are said with pity and disgust rather than anger.
Vote the Bums Out: the Eight Worst Members of Congress John Avlon November 2, 2012

Their anger influenced congressmen and senators and eventually President Obama.
Plugging the Hole in BP Tom Bower July 25, 2010

Lynch says he discovered the practice 40 years via his sister when he was struggling with anger and anxiety.
David Lynch Discusses Transcendental Meditation in Los Angeles Sean Macaulay April 6, 2013

Historical Examples

But great was Hatteras’s anger at finding the way to the north closed!
The Voyages and Adventures of Captain Hatteras Jules Verne

It was out of this anger, oddly enough, that the memory of the girl came to him.
Way of the Lawless Max Brand

The anger had ebbed from Dan’s brain, although his attitude had not relaxed.
The Destroyer Burton Egbert Stevenson

anger contracted the face of Henry Allister; he nodded gravely.
Way of the Lawless Max Brand

Al’s anger and contempt were so great that he had lost all sense of discretion.
With Sully into the Sioux Land Joseph Mills Hanson

noun
a feeling of great annoyance or antagonism as the result of some real or supposed grievance; rage; wrath
verb
(transitive) to make angry; enrage
v.

c.1200, “to irritate, annoy, provoke,” from Old Norse angra “to grieve, vex, distress; to be vexed at, take offense with,” from Proto-Germanic *angus (cf. Old English enge “narrow, painful,” Middle Dutch enghe, Gothic aggwus “narrow”), from PIE root *angh- “tight, painfully constricted, painful” (cf. Sanskrit amhu- “narrow,” amhah “anguish;” Armenian anjuk “narrow;” Lithuanian ankstas “narrow;” Greek ankhein “to squeeze,” ankhone “a strangling;” Latin angere “to throttle, torment;” Old Irish cum-ang “straitness, want”). In Middle English, also of physical pain. Meaning “excite to wrath, make angry” is from late 14c. Related: Angered; angering.
n.

mid-13c., “distress, suffering; anguish, agony,” also “hostile attitude, ill will, surliness,” from Old Norse angr “distress, grief. sorrow, affliction,” from the same root as anger (v.). Sense of “rage, wrath” is early 14c. Old Norse also had angr-gapi “rash, foolish person;” angr-lauss “free from care;” angr-lyndi “sadness, low spirits.”

the emotion of instant displeasure on account of something evil that presents itself to our view. In itself it is an original susceptibility of our nature, just as love is, and is not necessarily sinful. It may, however, become sinful when causeless, or excessive, or protracted (Matt. 5:22; Eph. 4:26; Col. 3:8). As ascribed to God, it merely denotes his displeasure with sin and with sinners (Ps. 7:11).

see: more in sorrow than in anger

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  • Angered

    a strong feeling of displeasure and belligerence aroused by a wrong; wrath; ire. Chiefly British Dialect. pain or smart, as of a sore. Obsolete. grief; trouble. to arouse anger or wrath in. Chiefly British Dialect. to cause to smart; inflame. to become : He angers with little provocation. Contemporary Examples He also angered gay rights […]

  • Angering

    a strong feeling of displeasure and belligerence aroused by a wrong; wrath; ire. Chiefly British Dialect. pain or smart, as of a sore. Obsolete. grief; trouble. to arouse anger or wrath in. Chiefly British Dialect. to cause to smart; inflame. to become : He angers with little provocation. Contemporary Examples He has since edged closer […]



  • Angerona

    the ancient Roman goddess of anguish.

  • Angerly

    Archaic. . Obsolete. hurtfully; painfully. Historical Examples Whan he was come, Mayster Vauasour all angerly sayde: thou knaue, why comest thou nat aweye with my cloke? Shakespeare Jest-Books; Unknown He is taught to stand in his own cceite: & if it be tak away, he angerly axeth for it again. The Education of Children Desiderius […]



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