Angering



a strong feeling of displeasure and belligerence aroused by a wrong; wrath; ire.
Chiefly British Dialect. pain or smart, as of a sore.
Obsolete. grief; trouble.
to arouse anger or wrath in.
Chiefly British Dialect. to cause to smart; inflame.
to become :
He angers with little provocation.
Contemporary Examples

He has since edged closer to the center, angering one-time Tea Party allies.
Swing States Sit Out Obamacare: What Four Holdouts Are Doing David Freedlander September 26, 2013

But Obama must walk a fine line between making the GOP lawmakers appear recalcitrant and angering them through harsh rhetoric.
Debt Talks Back On Howard Kurtz July 10, 2011

On the other hand, Eliot Spitzer was a moral scold whose steamrolling manner was angering even his allies.
How to Survive a Sex Scandal: Mark Sanford Edition David Freedlander April 4, 2013

Thrown into the Middle East pyre, the Zionism-racism charge has been an accelerant, angering, alienating, polarizing both sides.
Delegitimizing Israel Makes Peace Harder to Achieve Gil Troy February 27, 2013

After angering the crowd with a late start in 2008, West was back with some better music, and a lot of preaching.
Kanye Returns to Bonnaroo With a Night of Lectures Daniel G. Hill June 14, 2014

Historical Examples

Those surrounding him, including his nearest by kinship, were afraid of angering the ruthless man by unwelcome counsel.
The Contemporary Review, Volume 36, September 1879 Various

She restrained herself so as not to say too much, but really it was angering her.
L’Assommoir Emile Zola

Fred’s name, thus introduced, always had the effect of angering Harriet.
Harriet and the Piper Kathleen Norris

The frankness of John’s speech, instead of angering him, pleased him much.
For the Temple G. A. Henty

It is vexing—it is angering, but it is not like death, not even sickness.
The Cloister and the Hearth Charles Reade

noun
a feeling of great annoyance or antagonism as the result of some real or supposed grievance; rage; wrath
verb
(transitive) to make angry; enrage
v.

c.1200, “to irritate, annoy, provoke,” from Old Norse angra “to grieve, vex, distress; to be vexed at, take offense with,” from Proto-Germanic *angus (cf. Old English enge “narrow, painful,” Middle Dutch enghe, Gothic aggwus “narrow”), from PIE root *angh- “tight, painfully constricted, painful” (cf. Sanskrit amhu- “narrow,” amhah “anguish;” Armenian anjuk “narrow;” Lithuanian ankstas “narrow;” Greek ankhein “to squeeze,” ankhone “a strangling;” Latin angere “to throttle, torment;” Old Irish cum-ang “straitness, want”). In Middle English, also of physical pain. Meaning “excite to wrath, make angry” is from late 14c. Related: Angered; angering.
n.

mid-13c., “distress, suffering; anguish, agony,” also “hostile attitude, ill will, surliness,” from Old Norse angr “distress, grief. sorrow, affliction,” from the same root as anger (v.). Sense of “rage, wrath” is early 14c. Old Norse also had angr-gapi “rash, foolish person;” angr-lauss “free from care;” angr-lyndi “sadness, low spirits.”

the emotion of instant displeasure on account of something evil that presents itself to our view. In itself it is an original susceptibility of our nature, just as love is, and is not necessarily sinful. It may, however, become sinful when causeless, or excessive, or protracted (Matt. 5:22; Eph. 4:26; Col. 3:8). As ascribed to God, it merely denotes his displeasure with sin and with sinners (Ps. 7:11).

see: more in sorrow than in anger

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    Archaic. . Obsolete. hurtfully; painfully. Historical Examples Whan he was come, Mayster Vauasour all angerly sayde: thou knaue, why comest thou nat aweye with my cloke? Shakespeare Jest-Books; Unknown He is taught to stand in his own cceite: & if it be tak away, he angerly axeth for it again. The Education of Children Desiderius […]



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    a city in and capital of Maine-et-Loire, in W France. a strong feeling of displeasure and belligerence aroused by a wrong; wrath; ire. Chiefly British Dialect. pain or smart, as of a sore. Obsolete. grief; trouble. to arouse anger or wrath in. Chiefly British Dialect. to cause to smart; inflame. to become : He angers […]

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