Antheridia



a male reproductive structure producing gametes, occurring in ferns, mosses, fungi, and algae.
Historical Examples

The same moisture which caused the antheridia to open also brings about the opening of the archegonia.
How to Know the Ferns S. Leonard Bastin

antheridia immersed in the thallus, covered with dentate scales.
The Manual of the Botany of the Northern United States Asa Gray

The antheridia open by means of a cap cell or groups of cells with mucilaginous contents.
Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 3 Various

Paraphyses, jointed filaments mixed with the antheridia of Mosses.
The Elements of Botany Asa Gray

Mycelium present; antheridia but no antherozoids; oogonia with one or more oospheres: Peronosporaceae, Saprolegniaceae.
Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 11, Slice 3 Various

They are reproduced by means of antheridia and oogonia developed in conceptacles, clustered together at the apex of the branches.
Sea-Weeds, Shells and Fossils Peter Gray

Among the antheridia are borne peculiar hairs (Fig. 59, p) tipped by a large globular cell.
Elements of Structural and Systematic Botany Douglas Houghton Campbell

If these are carefully separated, the antheridia can just be seen as minute whitish globules, barely visible to the naked eye.
Elements of Structural and Systematic Botany Douglas Houghton Campbell

antheridia 3–20, in the axils of small saccate leaves, which are scarcely imbricate or crowded into terminal heads.
The Manual of the Botany of the Northern United States Asa Gray

The sexual organs, with the exception of the antheridia of Sphagnum, are borne at the apices of the main shoot or of branches.
Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 3 Various

noun (pl) -ia (-ɪə)
the male sex organ of algae, fungi, bryophytes, and spore-bearing vascular plants, such as ferns, which produces antherozoids
antheridium
(ān’thə-rĭd’ē-əm)
Plural antheridia (ān’thə-rĭd’ē-ə)
An organ in certain organisms that produces male gametes. Antheridia are found in many groups of organisms, including the bryophytes, ferns, ascomycete fungi, and some algae. Most gymnosperms and all angiosperms, however, have lost the antheridium, and its role is filled by the pollen grain. Compare archegonium.

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  • Antheridium

    a male reproductive structure producing gametes, occurring in ferns, mosses, fungi, and algae. Historical Examples Oogonium with the central uninucleate oosphere and the fertilizing tube (a) of the antheridium which introduces the male nucleus. Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 11, Slice 3 Various A fruiting portion, magnified, showing the structure; a sporocarp, and an antheridium. […]

  • Antheridiophore

    antheridiophore antheridiophore (ān’thə-rĭd’ē-ə-fôr’) A structure that bears the antheridia in some liverworts. See more at liverwort.



  • Antherozoid

    the motile male gamete produced in an antheridium. Historical Examples The product of the union of an antherozoid and an oosphere is termed an oospore. Scientific American Supplement, Vol. XXI., No. 531, March 6, 1886 Various noun one of many small male gametes produced in an antheridium antherozoid (ān’thər-ə-zō’ĭd) See spermatozoid.

  • Anthesis

    the period or act of expansion in flowers, especially the maturing of the stamens. Historical Examples anthesis, anthropocosmic—— Say, I’m glad you didn’t call me that! Left Guard Gilbert Ralph Henry Barbour These glands secrete a viscid juice at the time of anthesis. A Handbook of Some South Indian Grasses Rai Bahadur K. Ranga Achariyar […]



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