Anthropometric



the measurement of the size and proportions of the human body.
Historical Examples

Compare this with the old Bertillon system of anthropometric measurements.
Scotland Yard George Dilnot

They were photographed, subjected to anthropometric examinations, and their finger prints taken, etc.
The Jesuits, 1534-1921 Thomas J. Campbell

The anthropometric committee reported to the British Association in 1883 that women are little more than half as strong as men.
Sex and Society William I. Thomas

The main objective is a description of these people by means of anthropometric procedure.
A Racial Study of the Fijians Norman E. Gabel

An anthropometric estimate of the man fails to reveal any reason for the distinction of my aversion.
Certain Personal Matters H. G. Wells

Of these most northerly peoples I have no anthropometric data.
The Negrito and Allied Types in the Philippines and The Ilongot or Ibilao of Luzon David P. Barrows

Unfortunately for anthropometric science, most of the bones are too much decayed to be of practical value.
Seventh Annual Report Various

The heightened stature of women was a favourite topic in anthropometric circles long before the War.
Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 159, September 15, 1920 Various

Modern science assists them from the start with anthropometric examinations, and scientific methods are in use in every school.
Historic Towns of the Western States Various

May I tell you about your brain, which is at present in the possession of the anthropometric Society?
Walt Whitman in Mickle Street Elizabeth Leavitt Keller

noun
the comparative study of sizes and proportions of the human body
adj.

1871, based on French anthropométrique, from anthropometry “measurement of the human body” + -ic.
n.

1839, “acquaintance with the dimensions of the parts of the human body,” from anthropo- + -metry. Perhaps modeled on French anthropometrie.

anthropometry an·thro·pom·e·try (ān’thrə-pŏm’ĭ-trē)
n.
The branch of anthropology concerned with comparative measurements of the human body and its parts.
an’thro·po·met’ric (-pə-mět’rĭk) or an’thro·po·met’ri·cal (-rĭ-kəl) adj.
an’thro·po·met’ri·cal·ly adv.
anthropometry
(ān’thrə-pŏm’ĭ-trē)
The study of human body measurement for use in anthropological classification and comparison. The use of such data as skull dimensions and body proportions in the attempt to classify human beings into racial, ethnic, and national groups has been largely discredited, but anthropometric techniques are still used in physical anthropology and paleoanthropology, especially to study evolutionary change in fossil hominid remains.

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