Antinomian



a person who maintains that Christians are freed from the moral law by virtue of grace as set forth in the gospel.
Contemporary Examples

Success in our politics often requires a voracious, antinomian egotism, a sense that rules are for others.
Palin Has Really Gone Rogue Michelle Goldberg July 1, 2009

Historical Examples

They call themselves “Anti-means Baptists” from their antinomian tenets.
The Hoosier Schoolmaster Edward Eggleston

That is antinomian or hypernomian, and judges law as well as fact.
Essays, Second Series Ralph Waldo Emerson

What a triumphant answer is here to the legalist on the one side, and the antinomian on the other!
Notes on the Book of Leviticus C. H. Mackintosh

Compare “antiseptic,” “antinomian,” “ultramontane,” “semicircle.”
“Stops” Paul Allardyce

And yet the Christian is not an antinomian; he is not a sort of free lance, sworn to no obedience.
Expositor’s Bible: Ezra, Nehemiah, and Esther Walter Adeney

This would be to push Paul’s argument to an antinomian extreme.
The Expositor’s Bible: The Epistle to the Galatians G. G. Findlay

The heresy was worse than antinomian that would cavil at feelings allowed by common consent to be divinely delicious.
Barren Honour: A Novel George A. Lawrence

Besides being an antinomian, he is a violent Jacobin and leveller, sir.
Shirley Charlotte Bront

The antinomian sect shortly after excited a still more dangerous commotion in the colony.
The Conquest of Canada (Vol. 1 of 2) George Warburton

adjective
relating to the doctrine that by faith and the dispensation of grace a Christian is released from the obligation of adhering to any moral law
noun
a member of a Christian sect holding such a doctrine
n.

“one who maintains the moral law is not binding on Christians under the law of grace,” 1640s, from Medieval Latin Antinomi, name given to a sect of this sort that arose in Germany in 1535, from Greek anti- “opposite, against” (see anti-) + nomos “rule, law” (see numismatics).

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  • Antinomianism

    a person who maintains that Christians are freed from the moral law by virtue of grace as set forth in the gospel. Historical Examples To attempt to reach the standing by my state is legalism; to refuse to judge my state by the standing is antinomianism. The Assembly of God C. (Charles) H. (Henry) Mackintosh […]

  • Antinomical

    opposition between one law, principle, rule, etc., and another. Philosophy. a contradiction between two statements, both apparently obtained by correct reasoning. noun (pl) -mies opposition of one law, principle, or rule to another; contradiction within a law (philosophy) contradiction existing between two apparently indubitable propositions; paradox n. 1590s, “contradiction in the laws,” from Latin antinomia, […]



  • Antinomic

    opposition between one law, principle, rule, etc., and another. Philosophy. a contradiction between two statements, both apparently obtained by correct reasoning. noun (pl) -mies opposition of one law, principle, or rule to another; contradiction within a law (philosophy) contradiction existing between two apparently indubitable propositions; paradox n. 1590s, “contradiction in the laws,” from Latin antinomia, […]

  • Antinomy

    opposition between one law, principle, rule, etc., and another. Philosophy. a contradiction between two statements, both apparently obtained by correct reasoning. Historical Examples It is even sought to reconcile the antinomy of freedom vs. God’s foreknowledge. A History of Mediaeval Jewish Philosophy Isaac Husik Besides, we have already discussed this subject in the antinomy of […]



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