Antiochus



(“the Great”) 241?–187 b.c., king of Syria 223–187.
(Antiochus Epiphanes) died 164? b.c, king of Syria 175–164?.
Contemporary Examples

antiochus IV had about as much in common with Aristotle as Rick Santorum has with Thomas Paine.
Don’t Let the Maccabees Win Matt Lerner December 3, 2013

antiochus precipitated a large-scale revolt in Judea by ordering an altar to Zeus erected in the Jewish temple.
Why Israel Named Its Gaza War After a Hanukkah Poem Ethan Perlson December 29, 2008

Historical Examples

antiochus, advancing suddenly, caught some of the Parthian troops at their barbarous work, and dispersed them without difficulty.
The Seven Great Monarchies Of The Ancient Eastern World, Vol 6. (of 7): Parthia George Rawlinson

The three principal ones were antiochus, Antigonus, and Pyrrhus.
Pyrrhus Jacob Abbott

It was after the war against antiochus and the expedition of Manlius that extravagance began to display itself at Rome.
History of Julius Caesar Vol. 1 of 2 Napoleon III, Emperor of the French, 1808-1873.

“And as sure as you are descended from King antiochus,” added Verus bowing.
The Emperor, Complete Georg Ebers

The tyranny of antiochus had caused a mighty popular reaction against the Hellenizing party among the Jews.
The Literature and History of New Testament Times J. Gresham (John Gresham) Machen

We now come to the period in which it was besieged by another antiochus, viz.
Ruins of Ancient Cities (Vol. I of II) Charles Bucke

antiochus Hierax at first assisted his brother Callinicus, but afterwards contended with him for Asia.
Observations upon the Prophecies of Daniel, and the Apocalypse of St. John Isaac Newton

antiochus encouraged the attempt and urged Lagoras to carry it out.
The Histories of Polybius, Vol. I (of 2) Polybius

noun
known as Antiochus the Great. 242–187 bc, king of Syria (223–187), who greatly extended the Seleucid empire but was forced (190) to surrender most of Asia Minor to the Romans
noun
?215–164 bc, Seleucid king of Syria (175–164), who attacked the Jews and provoked the revolt of the Maccabees

the name of several Syrian kings from B.C. 280 to B.C. 65. The most notable of these were, (1.) Antiochus the Great, who ascended the throne B.C. 223. He is regarded as the “king of the north” referred to in Dan. 11:13-19. He was succeeded (B.C. 187) by his son, Seleucus Philopater, spoken of by Daniel (11:20) as “a raiser of taxes”, in the Revised Version, “one that shall cause an exactor to pass through the glory of the kingdom.” (2.) Antiochus IV., surnamed “Epiphanes” i.e., the Illustrious, succeeded his brother Seleucus (B.C. 175). His career and character are prophetically described by Daniel (11:21-32). He was a “vile person.” In a spirit of revenge he organized an expedition against Jerusalem, which he destroyed, putting vast multitudes of its inhabitants to death in the most cruel manner. From this time the Jews began the great war of independence under their heroic Maccabean leaders with marked success, defeating the armies of Antiochus that were sent against them. Enraged at this, Antiochus marched against them in person, threatening utterly to exterminate the nation; but on the way he was suddenly arrested by the hand of death (B.C. 164).

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