Archimedean



of, relating to, or discovered by Archimedes.
Mathematics. of or relating to any ordered field, as the field of real numbers, having the property that for any two unequal positive elements there is an integral multiple of the smaller which is greater than the larger.
Historical Examples

Never mind what the after-dinner speaker says—the press is not an Archimedean lever and probably never was.
Local Color Irvin S. Cobb

The invention with which his name is most frequently linked is that of the Archimedean screw.
Invention Bradley A. Fiske

An Archimedean lever had been found at last with which to move the world.
Inventions in the Century William Henry Doolittle

When a business man once gets his mind set, not even an Archimedean lever could stir it.
The Holy Cross and Other Tales Eugene Field

There are no sects in geometry; one does not speak of a Euclidian, an Archimedean.
Voltaire’s Philosophical Dictionary Voltaire

He had found what he had so long sighed for in vain,—his point d’appui, wherein to fix the Archimedean screw.
The Caxtons, Complete Edward Bulwer-Lytton

This term generally alludes to the Archimedean screw, or screw-propeller.
The Sailor’s Word-Book William Henry Smyth

The former is styled the Archimedean, the latter the Phantom Minnow, which collapses when struck by a fish.
The Teesdale Angler R Lakeland

Of these the best known are the block and tackle, the endless screw (worm gear), and the water snail, or Archimedean screw.
The Story of Great Inventions Elmer Ellsworth Burns

For the uplift of his flagging, flaccid will he seemed likely to require either the Archimedean lever or the Archimedean screw.
The Tigress Anne Warner

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  • Archimedes’ screw

    a device consisting essentially of a spiral passage within an inclined cylinder for raising water to a height when rotated. noun an ancient type of water-lifting device making use of a spiral passage in an inclined cylinder. The water is raised when the spiral is rotated

  • Archimedean solid

    archimedean solid Archimedean solid (är’kə-mē’dē-ən, -mĭ-dē’-) A polyhedron whose faces are regular polygons and whose angles are all congruent. The faces may all be of the same type, in which case the solid is a regular polyhedron, or may be of different types. There are only thirteen Archimedean solids. See more under polyhedron.



  • Archimedes

    287?–212 b.c, Greek mathematician, physicist, and inventor: discovered the principles of specific gravity and of the lever. Contemporary Examples Beethoven took long walks, Jung said, and Archimedes, hot baths. World Science Festival: Can We Really Live to 1,000? Casey Schwartz June 4, 2011 Historical Examples Archimedes defines a straight line as the shortest distance between […]

  • Archimedes principle

    the law that a body immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force (buoyant force) equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body. noun a law of physics stating that the apparent upward force (buoyancy) of a body immersed in a fluid is equal to the weight of the displaced […]



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