to seize (a person) by legal authority or warrant; take into custody:
The police arrested the burglar.
to catch and hold; attract and fix; engage:
The loud noise arrested our attention.
to check the course of; stop; slow down:
to arrest progress.
Medicine/Medical. to control or stop the active progress of (a disease):
The new drug did not arrest the cancer.
the taking of a person into legal custody, as by officers of the law.
any seizure or taking by force.
an act of stopping or the state of being stopped:
the arrest of tooth decay.
Machinery. any device for stopping machinery; stop.
under arrest, in custody of the police or other legal authorities:
They placed the suspect under arrest at the scene of the crime.
Historical Examples

arrestment on arrestment falls quick, continual; followed by death.
The French Revolution Thomas Carlyle

arrestment on arrestment follows quick, continual; “The guillotine goes not ill.”
The World’s Greatest Books, Vol XII. Arthur Mee

The first of these is the bill which he introduced last session with the object of limiting the arrestment of wages.
Western Worthies J. Stephen Jeans

If these be passed, it usually spreads up the leg to just below the knee before signs of arrestment appear.
Manual of Surgery Alexis Thomson and Alexander Miles

No passage Spainward from the Thames; well if arrestment do not suddenly come from the Thames!
The Life of John Sterling Thomas Carlyle

(Scots law) the seizure of money or property to prevent a debtor paying one creditor in advance of another
verb (transitive)
to deprive (a person) of liberty by taking him into custody, esp under lawful authority
to seize (a ship) under lawful authority
to slow or stop the development or progress of (a disease, growth, etc)
to catch and hold (one’s attention, sight, etc)
(law) arrest judgment, to stay proceedings after a verdict, on the grounds of error or possible error
(informal) can’t get arrested, (of a performer) is unrecognized and unsuccessful: he can’t get arrested here but is a megastar in the States
the act of taking a person into custody, esp under lawful authority
the act of seizing and holding a ship under lawful authority
the state of being held, esp under lawful authority: under arrest
Also called arrestation (ˌærɛsˈteɪʃən). the slowing or stopping of the development or progress of something
the stopping or sudden cessation of motion of something: a cardiac arrest

“to cause to stop,” also “to detain legally,” late 14c., from Old French arester “to stay, stop” (Modern French arrêter), from Vulgar Latin *arrestare (source of Italian arrestare, Spanish and Portuguese arrestar), from Latin ad- “to” (see ad-) + restare “to stop, remain behind, stay back” (see rest (n.2)). Figurative sense of “to catch and hold” (the attention, etc.) is from 1814.

late 14c., from Anglo-French arest, Old French areste, from arester (see arrest (v.)).

arrest ar·rest (ə-rěst’)
v. ar·rest·ed, ar·rest·ing, ar·rests

To stop; check.

To undergo cardiac arrest.


An interference with or a checking of the regular course of a disease or symptom, a stoppage.

Interference with the performance of a function.

The inhibition of a developmental process, usually the ultimate stage of development.

see: under arrest


Read Also:

  • Arrestor

    Also, arrestor. a person or thing that . Electricity, . noun a person who arrests a thing that stops or checks motion, esp a mechanism of wires for slowing aeroplanes as they land on an aircraft carrier

  • Arretine ware

    a red-glazed terracotta pottery produced in Tuscany from 100 b.c. to a.d. 100 and widely traded. noun another term for Samian ware (sense 2)

  • Arretine

    adjective of or relating to Arretium (the ancient Latin name of Arezzo, a city in central Italy) Historical Examples These in their turn gave way to the arretine and so-called “Samian” red wares of the Roman period. Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 5, Slice 6 Various

  • Arretium

    noun the ancient Latin name of Arezzo Historical Examples Caius Calpurnius was ordered not to move his army from arretium till his successor had arrived. History of Rome, Vol III Titus Livius He afterward defended a woman of arretium in the spirit of antagonism to Sulla. Life of Cicero Anthony Trollope arretium took the part […]

Disclaimer: Arrestment definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.