making claims or pretensions to superior importance or rights; overbearingly assuming; insolently proud:
an arrogant public official.
characterized by or proceeding from , or a sense of superiority, self-importance, or entitlement:
arrogant claims.
Contemporary Examples

The rejectionist absolutism of Morris and others is simplistic, a-historical, full of inaccuracies and arrogantly one-sided.
A Second Response to Benny Morris Daniel Levy April 23, 2012

On the other hand, the success of the Olympics could be arrogantly misused by English politicians.
Take a Bow, London: The Olympics Were a Triumph Peter Jukes August 12, 2012

Historical Examples

He cast a glance of contempt on his eldest-born, and arrogantly puffed his pipe.
His “Day In Court” Charles Egbert Craddock (AKA Mary Noailles Murfree)

He had told her then, arrogantly, that she’d need him some day.
Wanderer of Infinity Harl Vincent

She must drop, and the arrogantly lifted head of the rattlesnake, crested with wrath, was ready for the stroke.
Nan Sherwood at Lakeview Hall Annie Roe Carr

He rose from the table, bowing grandly, superbly, arrogantly.
In Kings’ Byways Stanley J. Weyman

She gave one look at herself in the glass, holding herself proudly, one might have said arrogantly.
Lady Connie Mrs. Humphry Ward

When the latter so arrogantly assumed the command, Hiens became very restive, and was waiting for an opportunity to dethrone him.
The Adventures of the Chevalier De La Salle and His Companions, in Their Explorations of the Prairies, Forests, Lakes, and Rivers, of the New World, and Their Interviews with the Savage Tribes, Two Hundred Years Ago John S. C. Abbott

Therefore he arrogantly pitied Red’s unsophistication; at which the gods laughed.
The Song of the Wolf Frank Mayer

“It wouldn’t ‘ave happened if I’d been there,” he observed, arrogantly.
At Sunwich Port, Complete W.W. Jacobs

having or showing an exaggerated opinion of one’s own importance, merit, ability, etc; conceited; overbearingly proud: an arrogant teacher, an arrogant assumption

late 14c., from Old French arrogant (14c.), from Latin arrogantem (nominative arrogans) “assuming, overbearing, insolent,” present participle of arrogare (see arrogance). Related: Arrogantly.


Read Also:

  • Arrogate

    to claim unwarrantably or presumptuously; assume or appropriate to oneself without right: to arrogate the right to make decisions. to attribute or assign to another; ascribe. Contemporary Examples It is definitely alarming that a president can arrogate to himself this kind of power, whoever the president is. Obama and the Justice Department Memo Michael Tomasky […]

  • Arrogation

    to claim unwarrantably or presumptuously; assume or appropriate to oneself without right: to arrogate the right to make decisions. to attribute or assign to another; ascribe. Historical Examples He ridicules the arrogation to itself by the ‘Compact’ of a monopoly of loyalty. The Tribune of Nova Scotia W. L. (William Lawson) Grant This arrogation of […]

  • Arrondissement

    the largest administrative division of a French department, comprising a number of cantons. an administrative district of certain large cities in France. noun (in France) the largest administrative subdivision of a department a municipal district of certain cities, esp Paris n. 1807, “administrative subdivision of a French department,” from French, literally “a rounding,” from stem […]

  • Arrow

    a slender, straight, generally pointed missile or weapon made to be shot from a bow and equipped with feathers at the end of the shaft near the nock, for controlling flight. anything resembling an arrow in form, function, or character. a linear figure having a wedge-shaped end, as one used on a map or architectural […]

Disclaimer: Arrogantly definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.