Artificial aid

Manège. (def 6b).
Historical Examples

Having “influence” to help them, they usually rely on this artificial aid—seldom upon themselves.
The Young Man and the World Albert J. Beveridge

An artificial aid to conversation and the repetition of threadbare stories, generally off-color.
The Roycroft Dictionary Elbert Hubbard

Then I can fill my cup without any artificial aid, or any painful effort.
Our Friend John Burroughs Clara Barrus

Some artificial aid is thus needed to prevent him from thinking of any arrangement but the right one.
“Stops” Paul Allardyce

In this case artificial respiration does not recall life, and respiration ceases when artificial aid is removed.
Chambers’s Journal of Popular Literature, Science, and Art, No. 696 Various

She is quite twenty-six (in spite of artificial aid), a fact that Lilian perceives with secret gratification.
Airy Fairy Lilian Margaret Wolfe Hamilton (AKA Duchess)

Certainly there is a limit in nature which can only be overcome by artificial aid.
The Open Air Richard Jefferies

Nothing can be more fanciful than that the highest of all mental gifts must have artificial aid.
The Gorgeous Isle Gertrude Atherton

But Sunflowers can be grown without any kind of artificial aid.
The Culture of Vegetables and Flowers From Seeds and Roots, 16th Edition Sutton and Sons

These recognitions alone dispense with the artificial aid of tokens or amulets.
Poetics Aristotle

(mountaineering) another name for aid (sense 5)


Read Also:

  • Artificial ankylosis

    . permanent surgical immobilization of a joint. artificial ankylosis ar·ti·fi·cial ankylosis (är’tə-fĭsh’əl) n. See arthrodesis. arthrodesis ar·throd·e·sis (är-thrŏd’ĭ-sĭs, är’thrə-dē’sĭs) n. The surgical fixation of a joint to promote bone fusion. Also called artificial ankylosis, syndesis.

  • Artificial blood

    a chemical emulsion, capable of carrying oxygen and carbon dioxide, for temporary use as a blood substitute in medical emergencies or when a patient objects to blood transfusions on religious grounds.

  • Artificial climbing

    the sport of climbing an artificially constructed, rocklike wall by means of footholds and handholds and, typically, a belaying device. noun another name for aid climbing noun the recreation of indoor or outdoor climbing on a manmade surface intended to simulate that of a mountain

  • Artificial daylight

    noun (physics) artificial light having approximately the same spectral characteristics as natural daylight

Disclaimer: Artificial aid definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.