Asperse



to attack with false, malicious, and damaging charges or insinuations; slander.
to sprinkle; bespatter.
Contemporary Examples

I don’t wish to asperse the fellow, but he does have a background as a Republican staffer and operative.
Who Inspects the Inspector? Michael Tomasky August 19, 2013

Historical Examples

For endeavoring to asperse your petitioner’s personal character in the most infamous manner.
Colonel John Brown, of Pittsfield, Massachusetts, the Brave Accuser of Benedict Arnold Archibald Murray Howe

Now it is you that asperse the present, and I that will defend it.
Vassall Morton Francis Parkman

You may insult me; but you have no right to asperse the memory of my mother.
Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 109, November 9th, 1895 Various

It is thus thine ancient character they (let us hope) asperse.
Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 98, April 26 1890 Various

Is it not grown so common a thing to asperse causelessly that no man wonders at it, that few dislike, that scarce any detest it?
Sermons on Evil-Speaking Isaac Barrow

“Not even scandal could asperse her motives in the present case,” said Lady Hester, with an insolent laugh.
The Daltons, Volume I (of II) Charles James Lever

I foresee that you, like an Orville, or a Mortimer, will suspect and asperse your mistress.
The Heroine Eaton Stannard Barrett

Who would dare to asperse the character of this perfect, lovely, and intellectual schoolmistress?
Beatrice H. Rider Haggard

Pope believed that Addison had employed Gildon to write against him, and had encouraged Phillips to asperse his character.
Calamities and Quarrels of Authors Isaac Disraeli

verb (transitive)
to spread false rumours about; defame
(rare) to sprinkle, as with water in baptism
v.

late 15c., “to besprinkle,” from Latin aspersus, past participle of aspergere (see aspersion). Meaning “to bespatter someone’s character with rumor and false reports” is recorded from 1610s.

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  • Asperser

    to attack with false, malicious, and damaging charges or insinuations; slander. to sprinkle; bespatter. verb (transitive) to spread false rumours about; defame (rare) to sprinkle, as with water in baptism v. late 15c., “to besprinkle,” from Latin aspersus, past participle of aspergere (see aspersion). Meaning “to bespatter someone’s character with rumor and false reports” is […]

  • Aspersion

    a damaging or derogatory remark or criticism; slander: casting aspersions on a campaign rival. the act of slandering; vilification; defamation; calumniation; derogation: Such vehement aspersions cannot be ignored. the act of sprinkling, as in baptism. Archaic. a shower or spray. Contemporary Examples I suspect that Obama, too—for all his personal angst over the Muslim aspersion—will […]



  • Aspersive

    to attack with false, malicious, and damaging charges or insinuations; slander. to sprinkle; bespatter. Historical Examples Of course the aspersive attitude toward York was that of Mrs. Snograss reflected in Rochambeau. The ghosts of their ancestors Weymer Jay Mills verb (transitive) to spread false rumours about; defame (rare) to sprinkle, as with water in baptism […]

  • Aspersorium

    a vessel for holding holy water. . Historical Examples The brush used for sprinkling is an aspergill (aspergillum), or aspersoir, and the vessel for this water an aspersorium. Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 2, Slice 7 Various And those figures that moved about it, with censor and aspersorium, were as angels for tenderness and dignity […]



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