constant; unremitting:
assiduous reading.
constant in application or effort; working diligently at a task; persevering; industrious; attentive:
an assiduous student.
Contemporary Examples

He has assiduously courted key figures in the Republican establishment.
Romney Rises Again Mark McKinnon December 15, 2009

He has taken care of the little guy, assiduously bringing home federal bucks to his impoverished district.
The Photo That Could Doom the Democrats Peter Beinart February 28, 2010

The assistant principal circles her, arms outstretched as if in a linebacker drill, but assiduously avoiding contact.
So Many Laws, So Little Time Philip K. Howard February 16, 2009

Four UBS traders, including one manager, assiduously worked with other banks to manipulate some LIBORs.
Speed Read: The Juiciest Bits From the UBS LIBOR Settlement
 Matthew Zeitlin December 18, 2012

The 47-year-old Virginian has assiduously created an identity for himself as face of the new Republican guard.
11 Politicians to Watch in 2011 Samuel P. Jacobs January 1, 2011

Historical Examples

What I have mentioned above of their dressing their heads too assiduously, is the case with all the ladies throughout Canada.
Montreal 1535-1914 under the French Rgime William Henry Atherton

Let this portion of the art be especially and assiduously cultivated.
The Ladies’ Work-Table Book Anonymous

He had a genuine talent for administration, and he devoted this talent most assiduously to selfish ends.
The American Revolution John Fiske

Several thousand mosquitos are assiduously eating the outpost.
Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 150, May 10, 1916 Various

The month of December was assiduously employed in and about the region last mentioned.
Memoir of Rev. Joseph Badger Elihu G. Holland

hard-working; persevering: an assiduous researcher
undertaken with perseverance and care: assiduous editing

1530s, from Latin assiduus “attending; continually present, incessant; busy; constant,” from assidere “to sit down to,” thus “constantly occupied” at one’s work; from ad “to” (see ad-) + sedere “to sit” (see sedentary). The word acquired a taint of “servility” in 18c. Related: Assiduously; assiduousness.


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