Assimilate



to take in and incorporate as one’s own; absorb:
He assimilated many new experiences on his European trip.
to bring into conformity with the customs, attitudes, etc., of a group, nation, or the like; adapt or adjust:
to assimilate the new immigrants.
Physiology. to convert (food) to substances suitable for incorporation into the body and its tissues.
to cause to resemble (usually followed by to or with).
to compare; liken (usually followed by to or with).
Phonetics. to modify by .
to be or become absorbed.
to conform or adjust to the customs, attitudes, etc., of a group, nation, or the like:
The new arrivals assimilated easily and quickly.
Physiology. (of food) to be converted into the substance of the body; be absorbed into the system.
to bear a resemblance (usually followed by to or with).
Phonetics. to become modified by .
something that is assimilated.
Contemporary Examples

Mercury sidling up to the Sun offers a clear outline for networking your way out of any stifling hives trying to assimilate you.
The Stars Predict Your Week Starsky + Cox September 17, 2011

Our bodies have a tendency to assimilate to the cognitive enhancements of tea, which can eventually lead to addiction.
Forget 5-Hour Energy: Tea Is a Better Buzz Gregory Ferenstein July 21, 2014

Americanah By Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie A woman struggles to assimilate in Nigeria after living in the U.S. for 13 years.
This Week’s Hot Reads: May 20, 2013 Cameron Martin, Jessica Ferri, Jimmy So May 19, 2013

This kind of death is not just a painful thing to assimilate; it triggers an emotionally complicated or conflicted process.
When a Parent Commits Suicide: A Psychiatrist’s Advice Dr. Harold S. Koplewicz May 17, 2012

Otherwise, Israeli Jews might assimilate—into something that looks very much like American Jews.
Shas Warns Against Assimilation in Israel Emily L. Hauser December 20, 2012

Historical Examples

Man’s function as a force of nature was to assimilate other forces as he assimilated food.
The Education of Henry Adams Henry Adams

He gives what His hearers might be assumed to be able to assimilate; but that is all.
The Conquest of Fear Basil King

Those who assimilate their imperfect natures to the perfect type will become orators.
Delsarte System of Oratory Various

He thought for himself, and yet he could assimilate the ideas of other men.
Shelley, Godwin and Their Circle H. N. Brailsford

Democracy has on one side to assimilate aristocracy, and not overturn it.
The Psychology of Nations G.E. Partridge

verb
(transitive) to learn (information, a procedure, etc) and understand it thoroughly
(transitive) to absorb (food) and incorporate it into the body tissues
(intransitive) to become absorbed, incorporated, or learned and understood
usually foll by into or with. to bring or come into harmony; adjust or become adjusted: the new immigrants assimilated easily
usually foll by to or with. to become or cause to become similar
(usually foll by to) (phonetics) to change (a consonant) or (of a consonant) to be changed into another under the influence of one adjacent to it: (n) often assimilates to ŋ before (k), as in “include”
v.

early 15c., from Latin assimilatus “feigned, pretended, fictitious,” past participle of assimilare “to make like,” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + simulare “make similar,” from similis “like, resembling” (see similar). Originally transitive (with to); intransitive use first recorded 1837. Related: Assimilated; assimilating.

assimilate as·sim·i·late (ə-sĭm’ə-lāt’)
v. as·sim·i·lat·ed, as·sim·i·lat·ing, as·sim·i·lates

To consume and incorporate nutrients into the body after digestion.

To transform food into living tissue by the process of anabolism.

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  • Assimilate with

    to take in and incorporate as one’s own; absorb: He assimilated many new experiences on his European trip. to bring into conformity with the customs, attitudes, etc., of a group, nation, or the like; adapt or adjust: to assimilate the new immigrants. Physiology. to convert (food) to substances suitable for incorporation into the body and […]

  • Assimilating

    to take in and incorporate as one’s own; absorb: He assimilated many new experiences on his European trip. to bring into conformity with the customs, attitudes, etc., of a group, nation, or the like; adapt or adjust: to assimilate the new immigrants. Physiology. to convert (food) to substances suitable for incorporation into the body and […]



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  • Assimilationism

    the practice or policy of assimilating or encouraging the of people from all ethnic groups and cultures of origin: In the 1900s, some immigrants at first resisted the assimilationism of the New World.



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