to take in and incorporate as one’s own; absorb:
He assimilated many new experiences on his European trip.
to bring into conformity with the customs, attitudes, etc., of a group, nation, or the like; adapt or adjust:
to assimilate the new immigrants.
Physiology. to convert (food) to substances suitable for incorporation into the body and its tissues.
to cause to resemble (usually followed by to or with).
to compare; liken (usually followed by to or with).
Phonetics. to modify by .
to be or become absorbed.
to conform or adjust to the customs, attitudes, etc., of a group, nation, or the like:
The new arrivals assimilated easily and quickly.
Physiology. (of food) to be converted into the substance of the body; be absorbed into the system.
to bear a resemblance (usually followed by to or with).
Phonetics. to become modified by .
something that is assimilated.
Historical Examples

His policy is not the policy of Rome the conqueror, but Rome the assimilator.
The Outline of History: Being a Plain History of Life and Mankind Herbert George Wells

We are introduced successively to the Palestinian, the assimilator, and the Neither-here-nor-there.
The History of Yiddish Literature in the Nineteenth Century Leo Wiener

Goethe was an assimilator and summed up in himself the spirit of a century, the attitude of predecessors and contemporaries.
Laurence Sterne in Germany Harvey Waterman Thayer

(transitive) to learn (information, a procedure, etc) and understand it thoroughly
(transitive) to absorb (food) and incorporate it into the body tissues
(intransitive) to become absorbed, incorporated, or learned and understood
usually foll by into or with. to bring or come into harmony; adjust or become adjusted: the new immigrants assimilated easily
usually foll by to or with. to become or cause to become similar
(usually foll by to) (phonetics) to change (a consonant) or (of a consonant) to be changed into another under the influence of one adjacent to it: (n) often assimilates to ŋ before (k), as in “include”

early 15c., from Latin assimilatus “feigned, pretended, fictitious,” past participle of assimilare “to make like,” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + simulare “make similar,” from similis “like, resembling” (see similar). Originally transitive (with to); intransitive use first recorded 1837. Related: Assimilated; assimilating.

assimilate as·sim·i·late (ə-sĭm’ə-lāt’)
v. as·sim·i·lat·ed, as·sim·i·lat·ing, as·sim·i·lates

To consume and incorporate nutrients into the body after digestion.

To transform food into living tissue by the process of anabolism.


Read Also:

  • Assiniboin

    a member of a Siouan people of northeastern Montana and adjacent parts of Canada. the dialect of Dakota spoken by the Assiniboin Indians. Historical Examples We took this opportunity of sending letters to Europe: the Assiniboin was assigned us for the continuation of the voyage. Travels in the Interior of North America, Part I, (Being […]

  • Assimilatory

    characterized by ; . Historical Examples It is the solar plexus which controls the assimilatory function in digestion. Fantasia of the Unconscious D. H. Lawrence Is it the cell rather than the organism that is the immediate agent of assimilatory processes? Form and Function E. S. (Edward Stuart) Russell Finally, various slugs and snails cause […]

  • Assiniboine

    a river in S Canada, flowing S and E from SE Saskatchewan into the Red River in S Manitoba. 450 miles (725 km) long. Mount, a mountain in E British Columbia, Canada, in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, on the Alberta border and the Continental Divide. 11,870 feet (3618 meters). Historical Examples Their course was in […]

  • Asshole deep

    asshole deep Related Terms up to one’s ass in something

Disclaimer: Assimilator definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.