Attract



to draw by a physical force causing or tending to cause to approach, adhere, or unite; pull (opposed to ):
The gravitational force of the earth attracts smaller bodies to it.
to draw by appealing to the emotions or senses, by stimulating interest, or by exciting admiration; allure; invite:
to attract attention; to attract admirers by one’s charm.
to possess or exert the power of .
Contemporary Examples

Many business leaders argue that the United States needs to attract more highly skilled immigrants.
Robots Undercut the Case for More Immigrants David Frum February 3, 2014

News that Palin is attending the screening is sure to attract press from all over the world—as did the first leg of her bus tour.
Sarah Palin Documentary ‘The Undefeated’: Palin Will Attend Iowa Premiere Shushannah Walshe June 24, 2011

Climate leaders need to model this spirit, as it is the only one that will ever attract a mass movement.
The Gay-Rights Playbook: How to Fight Climate Change Now Lisa Bennett July 9, 2013

Having Andreessen in charge would enable Yahoo to attract talent, he adds.
The Paris Hilton of Tech Dan Lyons October 24, 2011

Now that the “Palin Primaries” are behind us, Republicans may try to attract more voters by moving to the center.
Why the GOP Should Embrace the Tea Party’s Message Tunku Varadarajan August 26, 2010

Historical Examples

It is just the sort of face likely to attract a young girl who is new to the world.
A Search For A Secret (Vol 1 of 3) G. A. Henty

There will be nothing to attract these poor children to one centre.
Fire Worship (From “Mosses From An Old Manse”) Nathaniel Hawthorne

That seemed to attract him; but he heard her “now,” and started.
Rest Harrow Maurice Hewlett

You are boasting of your merits, Sir: let merit be your boast; nothing else can attract me.
Clarissa, Volume 3 (of 9) Samuel Richardson

Quite sufficiently beautiful to attract partners, and one came up and requested her to dance.
Verner’s Pride Mrs. Henry Wood

verb (mainly transitive)
to draw (notice, a crowd of observers, etc) to oneself by conspicuous behaviour or appearance (esp in the phrase attract attention)
(also intransitive) to exert a force on (a body) that tends to cause an approach or oppose a separation: the gravitational pull of the earth attracts objects to it
to possess some property that pulls or draws (something) towards itself: jam attracts wasps
(also intransitive) to exert a pleasing, alluring, or fascinating influence (upon); be attractive (to)
v.

early 15c., from Latin attractus, past participle of attrahere “to draw, pull; to attract,” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + trahere “draw” (see tract (n.1)).

Originally a medical term for the body’s tendency to absorb fluids, nourishment, etc., or for a poultice treatment to “draw out” diseased matter (1560s). Of the ability of people or animals to draw others to them, it is attested from 1560s; of physical forces (magnetism, etc.), from c.1600 (implied in attraction). Related: Attracted; attracting.

verb

To steal: attracted some lumber and built a garage (1891+)

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    the capacity, especially of a pheremone, to attract.

  • Attractant

    an agent or substance; lure: the sex attractant of the cockroach; a synthetic attractant used to bait insect traps. noun a substance that attracts, esp a chemical (sex attractant) produced by an insect and attracting insects of the same species See also pheromone



  • Attracted

    to draw by a physical force causing or tending to cause to approach, adhere, or unite; pull (opposed to ): The gravitational force of the earth attracts smaller bodies to it. to draw by appealing to the emotions or senses, by stimulating interest, or by exciting admiration; allure; invite: to attract attention; to attract admirers […]

  • Attracter

    to draw by a physical force causing or tending to cause to approach, adhere, or unite; pull (opposed to ): The gravitational force of the earth attracts smaller bodies to it. to draw by appealing to the emotions or senses, by stimulating interest, or by exciting admiration; allure; invite: to attract attention; to attract admirers […]



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