Authorise



to give or official power to; empower:
to authorize an employee to sign purchase orders.
to give for; formally sanction (an act or proceeding):
Congress authorized the new tax on tobacco.
to establish by or usage:
an arrangement long authorized by etiquette books.
to afford a ground for; warrant; justify.
Contemporary Examples

I did not authorise, nor was I aware of, phone hacking under my editorship.
Rebekah Brooks, Andy Coulson, and Fleet Street’s Elite Charged Peter Jukes July 23, 2012

Historical Examples

To authorise the Prince to accept the government of another State.
Bulgaria Frank Fox

Do you authorise me to speak—a little—as if I have an interest?
The Outcry Henry James

He represented to the Earl of Kilmarnock, that the rules of war did not authorise the outrage which was contemplated.
Memoirs of the Jacobites of 1715 and 1745 Mrs. Thomson

It was at the time when the Chamber was asked to authorise the issue of lottery stock.
The Three Cities Trilogy, Complete Emile Zola

Parliament alone could authorise the representation of this production.
Handel Romain Rolland

And remember also that I do not authorise you in any way to resume this conversation.
The Man Bram Stoker

Then will you authorise me to give the necessary orders so your carriage and servants will be ready at that hour?
Pride Eugne Sue

I will gladly do so,” said Dr. Martin, “if Mr. and Mrs. Fairfield authorise it.
Patty’s Summer Days Carolyn Wells

We know really nothing about primitive man, there is not sufficient evidence to authorise conjectures.
The Idea of Progress J. B. Bury

verb (transitive)
to confer authority upon (someone to do something); empower
to permit (someone to do or be something) with official sanction: a dealer authorized by a manufacturer to retail his products
v.

chiefly British English spelling of authorize (q.v.); for suffix, see -ize. Related: Authorised; authorising.
v.

“give formal approval to,” late 14c., autorisen, from Old French autoriser “authorize, give authority to” (12c.), from Medieval Latin auctorizare, from auctor (see author (n.)). Modern spelling from 16c. Related: Authorized; authorizing.

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Authorize

    to give or official power to; empower: to authorize an employee to sign purchase orders. to give for; formally sanction (an act or proceeding): Congress authorized the new tax on tobacco. to establish by or usage: an arrangement long authorized by etiquette books. to afford a ground for; warrant; justify. Contemporary Examples She voted to […]

  • Authoritarian personality

    authoritarian personality authoritarian personality au·thor·i·tar·i·an personality (ə-thôr’ĭ-târ’ē-ən, ô-thôr’-) n. A personality pattern reflecting a desire for security, order, power, and status, with a desire for structured lines of authority, a conventional set of values or outlook, a demand for unquestioning obedience, and a tendency to be hostile toward or use as scapegoats individuals of minority […]



  • Authoritarianism

    favoring complete obedience or subjection to as opposed to individual freedom: authoritarian principles; authoritarian attitudes. of or relating to a governmental or political system, principle, or practice in which individual freedom is held as completely subordinate to the power or of the state, centered either in one person or a small group that is not […]

  • Authoritative

    having due ; having the sanction or weight of : an authoritative opinion. substantiated or supported by documentary evidence and accepted by most in a field: an authoritative edition of Shakespeare; an authoritative treatment of a subject. having an air of ; accustomed to exercising ; positive; peremptory; dictatorial: said with an authoritative air. Contemporary […]



Disclaimer: Authorise definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.