to be of use or value to; profit; advantage:
All our efforts availed us little in trying to effect a change.
to be of use; have force or efficacy; serve; help:
His strength did not avail against the hostile onslaught.
to be of value or profit.
advantage; use; efficacy; effective use in the achievement of a goal or objective:
His belated help will be of little or no avail.
avails, Archaic. profits or proceeds.
avail oneself of, to use to one’s advantage:
They availed themselves of the opportunity to hear a free concert.
Historical Examples

In his unrestrained anger, Erasmus avails himself of the most unworthy weapons.
Erasmus and the Age of Reformation Johan Huizinga

He is legally entitled to demand it, and he avails himself of his right to the utmost.
The Rider of Waroona Firth Scott

Since thou doest not live, what avails it that the world has any further continuance?
Some Specimens of the Poetry of the Ancient Welsh Bards Evan Evans

The Revised Version translates, “avails much in its working.”
George Muller of Bristol Arthur T. Pierson

There is no counsel, no caution that avails against destiny.
The Revolt of the Angels Anatole France

Prince Lichtenstein is eloquent, conciliatory; but it avails not.
History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. IX. (of XXI.) Thomas Carlyle

Neither the miraculous coat, nor the miraculous mother, avails aught against this untoward generation, charm they never so wisely.
Speeches, Addresses, and Occasional Sermons, Volume 2 (of 3) Theodore Parker

For what avails it that you have the finest horse, if another ride him better?
Tales And Novels, Volume 9 (of 10) Maria Edgeworth

He avails himself of all these advantages and finds that they answer his purpose.
The Origins of Contemporary France, Volume 6 (of 6) Hippolyte A. Taine

I stay my haste, I make delays, For what avails this eager pace?
Graded Poetry: Second Year Various

to be of use, advantage, profit, or assistance (to)
avail oneself of, to make use of to one’s advantage
use or advantage (esp in the phrases of no avail, to little avail)

c.1300, availen, apparently a French compound formed in English from Old French a- “to” (see ad-) + vailen “to avail,” from vaill-, present stem of valoir “be worth,” from Latin valere (see valiant). Related: Availed; availing. As a noun, from c.1400.
In addition to the idiom beginning with avail


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