Baited



food, or some substitute, used as a lure in fishing, trapping, etc.
a poisoned lure used in exterminating pests.
an allurement; enticement:
Employees were lured with the bait of annual bonuses.
an object for pulling molten or liquefied material, as glass, from a vat or the like by adhesion.
South Midland and Southern U.S.

a large or sufficient quantity or amount:
He fetched a good bait of wood.
an excessive quantity or amount.

British Slang. food.
to prepare (a hook or trap) with bait.
to entice by deception or trickery so as to entrap or destroy:
using fake signal lights to bait the ships onto the rocks.
to attract, tempt, or captivate.
to set dogs upon (an animal) for sport.
to worry, torment, or persecute, especially with malicious remarks:
a nasty habit of baiting defenseless subordinates.
to tease:
They love to bait him about his gaudy ties.
to feed and water (a horse or other animal), especially during a journey.
to stop for food or refreshment during a journey.
(of a horse or other animal) to take food; feed.
Contemporary Examples

As the country waited with baited breath, national media covered the mission to rescue the miners, stuck 240 feet underground.
The Bangladesh Factory Collapse Survivor and More Miraculous Rescues (VIDEO) Holly Bernal, Ben Teitelbaum May 9, 2013

She baited the line and stood on the muddy bank in that outfit.
Meghan McCain on Her Grandmother Roberta McCain’s 100th Birthday Meghan McCain February 6, 2012

God has his ways of evening out the score—and one waits with baited schadenfraude and trembling.
‘Mom, Dad—I Need $96K’ Kathleen Parker July 9, 2009

Another soldier was outed by an Evangelical roommate who had baited him into the revelation.
My Life as a Gay Officer Anonymous May 25, 2010

Historical Examples

She baited a line for herself, dropped it in, and everyone else did the same thing.
Winona of the Camp Fire Margaret Widdemer

And I found that it could be baited and mellowed only by a liberal tip.
The Book of Khalid Ameen Rihani

Then, as Ellinwood rowed slowly, Code paid the baited trawl-line out of the tubs.
The Harbor of Doubt Frank Williams

“That ought to fetch them,” she said, eying the baited line with an air of satisfaction.
Nell, of Shorne Mills Charles Garvice

The trap had been baited for us, and it was well that we had not walked into it.
The Fifth Battalion Highland Light Infantry in the War 1914-1918 F.L. Morrison

Having thus set and baited his trap, he proceeded to spring it.
Pocket Island Charles Clark Munn

noun
something edible, such as soft bread paste, worms, or pieces of meat, fixed to a hook or in a trap to attract fish or animals
an enticement; temptation
a variant spelling of bate4
(Northern English, dialect) food, esp a packed lunch
(archaic) a short stop for refreshment during a journey
verb
(transitive) to put a piece of food on or in (a hook or trap)
(transitive) to persecute or tease
(transitive) to entice; tempt
(transitive) to set dogs upon (a bear, etc)
(transitive) (archaic) to feed (a horse), esp during a break in a journey
(intransitive) (archaic) to stop for rest and refreshment during a journey
verb
a variant spelling of bate2
adj.

c.1600, “furnished with bait,” past participle adjective from bait (v.2). Hence, in a figurative sense, “exciting, alluring” (1650s). For bated breath see bate (v.1).
n.

“food put on a hook or trap to lure prey,” c.1300, from Old Norse beita “food,” related to Old Norse beit “pasture,” Old English bat “food,” literally “to cause to bite” (see bait (v.)). Figurative sense “anything used as a lure” is from c.1400.
v.

“to torment or goad (someone unable to escape, and to take pleasure in it),” c.1300, beyten, a figurative use from the literal sense of “to set dogs on,” from the medieval entertainment of setting dogs on some ferocious animal to bite and worry it (the literal use is attested from c.1300); from Old Norse beita “to cause to bite,” from Proto-Germanic *baitan (cf. Old English bætan “to cause to bite,” Old High German beizzen “to bait,” Middle High German beiz “hunting,” German beizen “to hawk, to cauterize, etch”), causative of *bitan (see bite (v.)); the causative word forked into the two meanings of “harass” and “food offered.” Related: Baited; baiting.

“to put food on a hook or in a trap,” c.1300, probably from bait (n.). Related: Baited; baiting.
In addition to the idiom beginning with
bait

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    food, or some substitute, used as a lure in fishing, trapping, etc. a poisoned lure used in exterminating pests. an allurement; enticement: Employees were lured with the bait of annual bonuses. an object for pulling molten or liquefied material, as glass, from a vat or the like by adhesion. South Midland and Southern U.S. a […]

  • Baiting

    food, or some substitute, used as a lure in fishing, trapping, etc. a poisoned lure used in exterminating pests. an allurement; enticement: Employees were lured with the bait of annual bonuses. an object for pulling molten or liquefied material, as glass, from a vat or the like by adhesion. South Midland and Southern U.S. a […]



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