Banneret



History/Historical. a knight who could bring a company of followers into the field under his own banner.
a rank of knighthood; knight banneret.
a small banner.
Historical Examples

The banneret and the baron were therefore soldiers of equal authority.
The History of Chivalry, Volume I (of 2) Charles Mills

“We owe them the less for their banquet,” said the banneret.
Anne of Geierstein, Volume I (of 2) Sir Walter Scott

The number of men at arms, whom a banneret ought to command, was properly fifty.
View of the State of Europe during the Middle Ages, Vol. 3 (of 3) Henry Hallam

When a banneret was created, the general cut off this pendant to render the banner square.
View of the State of Europe during the Middle Ages, Vol. 3 (of 3) Henry Hallam

The wife of a banneret was styled une dame bannerette, and the general title of his family was a hostel bannière.
The History of Chivalry, Volume I (of 2) Charles Mills

banneret, ban′ėr-et, n. a higher class of knight, inferior to a baron.
Chambers’s Twentieth Century Dictionary (part 1 of 4: A-D) Various

The banner of the banneret and baron was displayed by the squire.
The History of Chivalry, Volume I (of 2) Charles Mills

The Pennon, as we have before seen, (p. 95,) was the flag of those knights who had not attained to the dignity of banneret.
Ancient Armour and Weapons in Europe John Hewitt

The bachelor and the banneret were both equally knights, only the one was of greater distinction and authority 854 than the other.
Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 15, Slice 8 Various

The peak of this awful spur was just touched by a fleecy cloud that shifted to and fro like a banneret.
Legends and Tales Bret Harte

noun (in the Middle Ages)
Also called knight banneret. a knight who was entitled to command other knights and men-at-arms under his own banner
a title of knighthood conferred by the king for valour on the battlefield
n.

c.1300, an order of knighthood, originally in reference to one who could lead his men into battle under his own banner. Later it meant one who received rank for valiant deeds done in the king’s presence in battle. Also “a small banner” (c.1300).

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