Banville



Théodore Faullain de
[tey-aw-dawr foh-lan duh] /teɪ ɔˈdɔr foʊˈlɛ̃ də/ (Show IPA), 1823–91, French poet and dramatist.
Contemporary Examples

And the best of luck to Mr. Banville and my old friend Marlowe.
Leave John Banville Alone! Why Chandler’s Marlowe Should Live On Ace Atkins September 5, 2012

Banville is the heir to Proust, via Nabokov, and not because there is a lot of sex in Ancient Light.
This Week’s Hot Reads, Oct. 1, 2012 Jimmy So October 1, 2012

Banville would win in 2005, but not without more controversy.
The 12 Biggest Booker Prize Controversies Thomas Flynn July 22, 2013

What if Banville just wanted to write a mystery story and make some money?
Can Pulp Win the Booker? Allen Barra September 6, 2011

No, even I agree that his vita makes Banville look like the man for the job.
John Banville’s Terrible Idea to Write a New Novel on Raymond Chandler’s Philip Marlowe Malcolm Jones August 9, 2012

That merits a chuckle, but Banville wins the battle of the pulp fatales.
Can Pulp Win the Booker? Allen Barra September 6, 2011

Banville may tarnish his hero a bit, particularly by tormenting him with alcohol.
Can Pulp Win the Booker? Allen Barra September 6, 2011

Historical Examples

If it was Hugo who invented French rhyme it was Banville who broke up the couplet.
Confessions of a Young Man George Moore

He seemed a new de Banville—dainty, dallying, and deft—a writer of witty and pretty verses—nothing more.
The Theory of the Theatre Clayton Hamilton

In these days Banville, like Gérard de Nerval in earlier times, ronsardised.
Essays in Little Andrew Lang

noun
Théodore de (teɔdɔr də). 1823–91, French poet, who anticipated the Parnassian school in his perfection of form and command of rhythm

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Banyalla

    Victorian box.

  • Banyan

    Also called banyan tree. an East Indian fig tree, Ficus benghalensis, of the mulberry family, having branches that send out adventitious roots to the ground and sometimes cause the tree to spread over a wide area. Also, bania, baniya. a Hindu trader or merchant of a particular caste, the rules of which forbid eating flesh. […]



  • Banyan-tree

    Also called banyan tree. an East Indian fig tree, Ficus benghalensis, of the mulberry family, having branches that send out adventitious roots to the ground and sometimes cause the tree to spread over a wide area. Also, bania, baniya. a Hindu trader or merchant of a particular caste, the rules of which forbid eating flesh. […]

  • Banyana banyana

    plural noun the South Africa women’s national soccer team



Disclaimer: Banville definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.