Bare one’s teeth



Also, show one’s teeth. Indicate hostility and readiness to fight, as in His refusal to accept my offer made it clear I’d have to bare my teeth, or In this instance, calling in a lawyer is showing one’s teeth. This figurative term transfers the snarl of a dog to human anger. It first was recorded as show one’s teeth in 1615.

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  • Bare out

    to hold up; support: to bear the weight of the roof. to hold or remain firm under (a load): The roof will not bear the strain of his weight. to bring forth (young); give birth to: to bear a child. to produce by natural growth: a tree that bears fruit. to hold up under; be […]

  • Bare-root

    of or relating to a tree or shrub prepared for transplanting by having all or most of the soil removed from about its roots.



  • Baresark

    Scandinavian Legend. a berserker. without armor. Historical Examples No baresark of them, nor Odin’s self, was a bit of truer stuff. The World’s Greatest Books, Vol XII. Arthur Mee Gizur looked first at his sword, then on the baresark, and lastly at Swanhild. Eric Brighteyes H. Rider Haggard “Then, thou yellow-headed puppy-dog, thou shalt go […]

  • Bare up

    to hold up; support: to bear the weight of the roof. to hold or remain firm under (a load): The roof will not bear the strain of his weight. to bring forth (young); give birth to: to bear a child. to produce by natural growth: a tree that bears fruit. to hold up under; be […]



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