Barometric



Meteorology. any instrument that measures atmospheric pressure.
Compare aneroid barometer, mercury barometer.
anything that indicates changes.
Historical Examples

The whole was kept at an even temperature, and correction was made for barometric influence.
Heroes of the Telegraph J. Munro

Unfortunately, the matter was one not to be settled by argument but by the Bourse, which has a barometric reasoning of its own.
Benjamin Franklin; Self-Revealed, Volume II (of 2) Wiliam Cabell Bruce

There were also two barometric tubes registering the lowest pressure, as well as thermometers and other scientific instruments.
Sounding the Ocean of Air A. Lawrence Rotch

Thirteen cubic feet of free air at normal temperature and barometric pressure weigh about one pound.
Scientific American Supplement, No. 799, April 25, 1891 Various

Pour mercury into the tube until the difference in level bd is just equal to the barometric height, approximately 32 inches.
General Science Bertha M. Clark

Such forms, however, are subject to the influence of barometric pressure and an alteration of 0.5 in.
Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 14, Slice 3 Various

The average height of the barometric column is 30 inches at sea-level.
Ontario Teachers’ Manuals: Nature Study Ontario Ministry of Education

These bright harsh days of barometric high pressure in England rouse and thwart every expectation of the happiness of spring.
Soul of a Bishop H. G. Wells

During a rise of barometric pressure such wells are sometimes observed to suck.
Meteorology Charles Fitzhugh Talman

Sir Isaac Newton was intensely interested in the hygrometric and barometric proceedings of the Danaids.
The Note-Books of Samuel Butler Samuel Butler

noun
an instrument for measuring atmospheric pressure, usually to determine altitude or weather changes
anything that shows change or impending change: the barometer of social change
adj.

1802, from barometer + -ic. Barometrical is recorded from 1660s.
n.

1660s, from Greek baros “weight” (from barys “heavy;” see grave (adj.)) + -meter. Probably coined (and certainly popularized) by English scientist Robert Boyle (1627-1691).
barometer
(bə-rŏm’ĭ-tər)
An instrument for measuring atmospheric pressure. Barometers are used in determining height above sea level and in forecasting the weather. The two primary types of barometers are the aneroid and the mercury barometer.

An instrument that measures atmospheric pressure.

Note: In general, when the barometer falls in response to a drop in pressure, bad weather is approaching; when the barometer rises because of an increase in pressure, good weather will follow.

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    atmospheric pressure. Historical Examples During a rise of barometric pressure such wells are sometimes observed to suck. Meteorology Charles Fitzhugh Talman Thirteen cubic feet of free air at normal temperature and barometric pressure weigh about one pound. Scientific American Supplement, No. 799, April 25, 1891 Various The results obtained as to the relation between dissipation […]

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