Barricade



a defensive barrier hastily constructed, as in a street, to stop an enemy.
any barrier that obstructs passage.
to obstruct or block with a barricade:
barricading the streets to prevent an attack.
to shut in and defend with or as if with a barricade:
The rebels had barricaded themselves in the old city.
Contemporary Examples

A white police officer standing amid the crowd inside the barricade got his laughs a moment later.
‘They Let Him Off?’ Scenes from NYC in Disbelief Jacob Siegel December 3, 2014

Lock the gates and barricade the fort, but those voices will be heard elsewhere.
Why The U.K. Zionist Federation Rejected Our Progressive Group Hannah Weisfeld February 28, 2013

Police had built a barricade of razor wire to keep the two groups apart.
Murder Threatens Mandela’s Dream Charlayne Hunter-Gault April 20, 2010

So they did, until around 5:20 the crowd found itself pressed up against a barricade with the Stock Exchange again in sight.
The Occupy Wall Street Blow-by-Blow Matthew DeLuca October 6, 2011

(Rioters) were building a barricade across Winchester Street and looking for material.
Frat Culture Clashes With Riot Police at Keene, N.H., Pumpkin Festival Melanie Plenda October 18, 2014

Historical Examples

Near morning an officer of volunteers came to inspect the barricade defences.
Vittoria, Complete George Meredith

The officers had come forward to the barricade and were consulting together.
The Slave Of The Lamp Henry Seton Merriman

Some time after this a body of them came to the barricade and persuaded the officers that they were deserters.
Hurricane Hurry W.H.G. Kingston

If you refuse to act with me, barricade the door between the bar and the north wing.
The Inn at the Red Oak Latta Griswold

When Louis and his party had reached the barricade, Edward, attended likewise by his friends, approached on the other side.
Richard III Jacob Abbott

noun
a barrier for defence, esp one erected hastily, as during street fighting
verb (transitive)
to erect a barricade across (an entrance, passageway, etc) or at points of access to (a room, district of a town, etc): they barricaded the door
(usually passive) to obstruct; block: his mind was barricaded against new ideas
v.

1590s, from Middle French barricader “to barricade” (1550s), from barrique “barrel,” from Spanish barrica “barrel,” from baril (see barrel). Revolutionary associations began during 1588 Huguenot riots in Paris, when large barrels filled with earth and stones were set up in the streets. Related: Barricaded; barricading.
n.

1640s, from barricade (v.). Earlier was barricado (1580s) with false Spanish ending (see -ado).

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  • Barricaded

    a defensive barrier hastily constructed, as in a street, to stop an enemy. any barrier that obstructs passage. to obstruct or block with a barricade: barricading the streets to prevent an attack. to shut in and defend with or as if with a barricade: The rebels had barricaded themselves in the old city. Contemporary Examples […]

  • Barricado

    a barricade. to barricade. Historical Examples The Doctor falls down before the barricado, and is stretched all his hapless length fainting on the floor. Recreations of Christopher North, Volume 2 John Wilson I renounce your defiance; if you parley so roughly, I’ll barricado my gates against you. A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Volume […]



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    Sir James M(atthew) 1860–1937, Scottish novelist, short-story writer, and playwright. a city in SE Ontario, in S Canada, NW of Toronto. Historical Examples Barrie said softly, looking out of the open window at the purple night, purple as heather. The Heather-Moon C. N. Williamson and A. M. Williamson They were just rising from breakfast when […]

  • Barrier

    anything built or serving to bar passage, as a railing, fence, or the like: People may pass through the barrier only when their train is announced. any natural bar or obstacle: a mountain barrier. anything that restrains or obstructs progress, access, etc.: a trade barrier. a limit or boundary of any kind: the barriers of […]



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