Beaconing



a guiding or warning signal, as a light or fire, especially one in an elevated position.
a tower or hill used for such purposes.
a lighthouse, signal buoy, etc., on a shore or at a dangerous area at sea to warn and guide vessels.
Navigation.

radio beacon.
a radar device at a fixed location that, upon receiving a radar pulse, transmits a reply pulse that enables the original sender to determine his or her position relative to the fixed location.

a person, act, or thing that warns or guides.
a person or thing that illuminates or inspires:
The Bible has been our beacon during this trouble.
Digital Technology, web beacon.
to serve as a beacon to; warn or guide.
to furnish or mark with beacons:
a ship assigned to beacon the shoals.
to serve or shine as a beacon:
A steady light beaconed from the shore.
Historical Examples

They hold and send forth the beaconing flash from every intellectual and loving light-house in the world.
The Cassowary Stanley Waterloo

My heart cleaved the eternity of separation, beaconing my sad return to them, and I followed gladly, hope being not yet dead.
Continental Monthly, Vol. 5, Issue 2, February, 1864 Various

The light of a great love shone out of the wonderful deeps of them, beaconing the way clear into the haven of her heart.
Lochinvar S. R. Crockett

noun
a signal fire or light on a hill, tower, etc, esp one used formerly as a warning of invasion
a hill on which such fires were lit
a lighthouse, signalling buoy, etc, used to warn or guide ships in dangerous waters
short for radio beacon
a radio or other signal marking a flight course in air navigation
short for Belisha beacon
a person or thing that serves as a guide, inspiration, or warning
a stone set by a surveyor to mark a corner or line of a site boundary, etc
verb
to guide or warn
(intransitive) to shine
n.

Old English beacen “sign, portent, lighthouse,” from West Germanic *baukna “beacon, signal” (cf. Old Frisian baken, Old Saxon bokan, Old High German bouhhan); not found outside Germanic. Perhaps borrowed from Latin bucina “a crooked horn or trumpet, signal horn.” But more likely from PIE *bhew-, a variant of the base *bha- “to gleam, shine” (see phantasm). Figurative use from c.1600.

a pole (Heb. to’ren) used as a standard or ensign set on the tops of mountains as a call to the people to assemble themselves for some great national purpose (Isa. 30:17). In Isa. 33:23 and Ezek. 27:5, the same word is rendered “mast.” (See Banner.)

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