any nonhuman animal, especially a large, four-footed mammal.
the crude animal nature common to humans and the lower animals:
Hunger brought out the beast in him.
a cruel, coarse, filthy, or otherwise beastlike person.
a live creature, as distinguished from a plant:
What manner of beast is this?
the beast, the Antichrist. Rev. 13:18.
Historical Examples

All these people, like himself, grown wild and beastlike, were seized by the same dark wave and carried away like rubbish.
Foma Gordyeff Maxim Gorky

In his heavy-lidded eyes, under-hung by watery pouches of sin and dissipation, there was a vengeful and beastlike glare.
The Hunted Woman James Oliver Curwood

There came from him an indescribable reek of tobacco, whisky, filthy clothes, and the beastlike odor of an unclean body.
A Woman Named Smith Marie Conway Oemler

There was a beastlike note in his voice that made the short hairs on Kennon’s neck prickle.
The Lani People J. F. Bone

The two beastlike wretches groan and strain at their fetters.
Life on a Mediaeval Barony William Stearns Davis

Lifting his sword, he sprang at me with a beastlike scream of rage and hate.
Montezuma’s Daughter H. Rider Haggard

It is one of the most beastly of all the beastlike traits in the moral physiognomy of man.
Folkways William Graham Sumner

Its frightful beak opened and closed, its beastlike talons sought to clutch support, its owl-like eyes became glazed and fixed.
The Boy Scouts of the Air in Indian Land Gordon Stuart

any animal other than man, esp a large wild quadruped
savage nature or characteristics: the beast in man
a brutal, uncivilized, or filthy person
(transitive) (military slang, slang, mainly Brit) to punish or torture (someone) in a manner that involves excessive physical exercise

c.1200, from Old French beste “animal, wild beast,” figuratively “fool, idiot” (11c., Modern French bête), from Vulgar Latin *besta, from Latin bestia “beast, wild animal,” of unknown origin. Used to translate Latin animal. Replaced Old English deor (see deer) as the generic word for “wild creature,” only to be ousted 16c. by animal. Of persons felt to be animal-like in various senses from early 13c. Of the figure in the Christian apocalypse story from late 14c.


A cheap prostitute (esp WWII Armed forces)
(also beastie, beasty) An especially unattractive woman (1940s+ Teenagers)
Any woman whatever, but esp a young, attractive one (1960s+ Jazz musicians)
A crude or sexually aggressive male; animal
Anything regarded as difficult and misbegotten: But that is part of the beast that was created (1860s+)

This word is used of flocks or herds of grazing animals (Ex. 22:5; Num. 20:4, 8, 11; Ps. 78:48); of beasts of burden (Gen. 45:17); of eatable beasts (Prov. 9:2); and of swift beasts or dromedaries (Isa. 60:6). In the New Testament it is used of a domestic animal as property (Rev. 18:13); as used for food (1 Cor. 15:39), for service (Luke 10:34; Acts 23:24), and for sacrifice (Acts 7:42). When used in contradistinction to man (Ps. 36:6), it denotes a brute creature generally, and when in contradistinction to creeping things (Lev. 11:2-7; 27:26), a four-footed animal. The Mosaic law required that beasts of labour should have rest on the Sabbath (Ex. 20:10; 23:12), and in the Sabbatical year all cattle were allowed to roam about freely, and eat whatever grew in the fields (Ex. 23:11; Lev. 25:7). No animal could be castrated (Lev. 22:24). Animals of different kinds were to be always kept separate (Lev. 19:19; Deut. 22:10). Oxen when used in threshing were not to be prevented from eating what was within their reach (Deut. 25:4; 1 Cor.9:9). This word is used figuratively of an infuriated multitude (1 Cor. 15:32; Acts 19:29; comp. Ps. 22:12, 16; Eccl. 3:18; Isa. 11:6-8), and of wicked men (2 Pet. 2:12). The four beasts of Daniel 7:3, 17, 23 represent four kingdoms or kings.


Read Also:

  • Beastliness

    of or like a beast; bestial. Informal. nasty; unpleasant; disagreeable. Chiefly British Informal. very; exceedingly: It’s beastly cold out. British Informal. disagreeably; outrageously: beastly rude. Historical Examples They are eminent in nothing, save as samples of beastliness. What a Young Husband Ought to Know Sylvanus Stall It was due to their low wages and to […]

  • Beat

    to strike violently or forcefully and repeatedly. to dash against: rain beating the trees. to flutter, flap, or rotate in or against: beating the air with its wings. to sound, as on a drum: beating a steady rhythm; to beat a tattoo. to stir vigorously: Beat the egg whites well. to break, forge, or make […]

  • Beat a dead horse

    something that has ceased to be useful or relevant. beat / flog a dead horse, to persist in pursuing or trying to revive interest in a project or subject that has lost its usefulness or relevance. a large, solid-hoofed, herbivorous quadruped, Equus caballus, domesticated since prehistoric times, bred in a number of varieties, and used […]

  • Beat a path to someone’s door

    Come to someone in great numbers, as in Ever since she appeared on television, agents have been beating a path to her door. The term beat a path alludes to the trampling action of many feet. [ Late 1500s ]

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