Becket



a short length of rope for securing spars, coils of rope, etc., having an eye at one end and a thick knot or a toggle at the other, which is passed through the eye.
a grommet of rope, as one used as a handle or oarlock.
a grommet or eye on a block to which the standing end of a fall can be secured.
a wooden cleat or hook secured to the shrouds of a sailing vessel to hold tacks and sheets not in use.
Saint Thomas à, 1118?–70, archbishop of Canterbury: murdered because of his opposition to Henry II’s policies toward the church.
Contemporary Examples

becket general counsel Kyle Duncan revealed this week that the company would defy the mandate while its appeal is in the works.
Hobby Lobby Risks Fines to Defy Obamacare David Sessions January 3, 2013

Historical Examples

“becket” is the best and most ambitious of them, though not, as “Queen Mary” is, a play designed for the stage.
Beacon Lights of History, Volume XIII John Lord

We know the Mallorings well, they’re only seven miles from us at becket.
The Freelands John Galsworthy

The king, quitting for a time his quarrel with becket, gathered a considerable army, and in 1165 passed into Wales.
Cassell’s History of England, Vol. I (of 9) Anonymous

Of becket, as it now was, they would not have approved at all.
The Freelands John Galsworthy

But neither the king nor -becket was to be moved by these evil reports.
A Legend of Reading Abbey Charles MacFarlane

becket could hardly have been prepared for the manner of his reception.
Cameos from English History, from Rollo to Edward II Charlotte Mary Yonge

Soon after word was brought to the king that becket, newly arrived in England, was again stirring up difficulties.
How France Built Her Cathedrals Elizabeth Boyle O’Reilly

No one has met with more abuse than becket, ever since the Reformation.
Cameos from English History, from Rollo to Edward II Charlotte Mary Yonge

The west window is modern, and represents scenes from the life of becket.
The Cathedrals of Great Britain P. H. Ditchfield

noun (nautical)
a clevis forming part of one end of a sheave, used for securing standing lines by means of a thimble
a short line with a grommet or eye at one end and a knot at the other, used for securing spars or other gear in place
noun
Saint Thomas à. 1118–70, English prelate; chancellor (1155–62) to Henry II; archbishop of Canterbury (1162–70): murdered following his opposition to Henry’s attempts to control the clergy. Feast day: Dec 29 or July 7

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    Saint Thomas à, 1118?–70, archbishop of Canterbury: murdered because of his opposition to Henry II’s policies toward the church. Saint, Becket, Saint Thomas à. noun (nautical) a clevis forming part of one end of a sheave, used for securing standing lines by means of a thimble a short line with a grommet or eye at […]



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