Bogey



Golf.

a score of one stroke over par on a hole.
par1 (def 3).

bogy1 (defs 1–3).
Also, bogy, bogie. Military. an unidentified aircraft or missile, especially one detected as a blip on a radar screen.
bogie1 .
Golf. to make a bogey on (a hole):
Arnold Palmer bogeyed the 18th hole.
a swim; bathe.
to swim; bathe.
bogart.
Humphrey (DeForest) (“Bogie”or”Bogey”) 1899–57, U.S. motion-picture actor.
a hobgoblin; evil spirit.
anything that haunts, frightens, annoys, or harasses.
something that functions as a real or imagined barrier that must be overcome, bettered, etc.:
Fear is the major bogy of novice mountain climbers. A speed of 40 knots is a bogy for motorboats.
Military, bogey1 (def 3).
Contemporary Examples

The Jockey Club Makes a Comeback Sandra McElwaine December 6, 2008

Historical Examples

Essays in the Study of Folk-Songs (1886) Countess Evelyn Martinengo-Cesaresco
Christopher and the Clockmakers Sara Ware Bassett
The Last Harvest John Burroughs
Roden’s Corner Henry Seton Merriman
The Golden Scarecrow Hugh Walpole
Jack Harkaway’s Boy Tinker Among The Turks Bracebridge Hemyng
The Happy Golfer Henry Leach
The Spirit of the Links Henry Leach
The Magnetic North Elizabeth Robins (C. E. Raimond)

noun
an evil or mischievous spirit
something that worries or annoys
(golf)

a score of one stroke over par on a hole Compare par (sense 5)
(obsolete) a standard score for a hole or course, regarded as one that a good player should make

(slang) a piece of dried mucus discharged from the nose
(air force, slang) an unidentified or hostile aircraft
(slang) a detective; policeman
verb
(transitive) (golf) to play (a hole) in one stroke over par
verb
to bathe or swim
noun
a bathe or swim
verb
(transitive) (slang) to monopolize or keep (something, esp a marijuana cigarette) to oneself selfishly
noun
Humphrey (DeForest). nicknamed Bogie. 1899–1957, US film actor: his films include High Sierra (1941), Casablanca (1942), The Big Sleep (1946), The African Queen (1951), and The Caine Mutiny (1954)
noun (pl) -gies
a variant spelling of bogey1 , bogie1
verb
Examples
Word Origin
n.

One popular song at least has left its permanent effect on the game of golf. That song is ‘The Bogey Man.’ In 1890 Dr. Thos. Browne, R.N., the hon. secretary of the Great Yarmouth Club, was playing against a Major Wellman, the match being against the ‘ground score,’ which was the name given to the scratch value of each hole. The system of playing against the ‘ground score’ was new to Major Wellman, and he exclaimed, thinking of the song of the moment, that his mysterious and well-nigh invincible opponent was a regular ‘bogey-man.’ The name ‘caught on’ at Great Yarmouth, and to-day ‘Bogey’ is one of the most feared opponents on all the courses that acknowledge him. [1908, cited in OED]

Other early golfing sources give it an American origin. As a verb, attested by 1948.
v.

A police officer (1930s+ Underworld)
An enemy aircraft, esp an attacking fighter plane (WWII Army Air Forces fr British RAF)
A golf score of one stroke over par on a given hole (late 1800s+ British)

To behave truculently; get something by intimidation: The little old lady bogarted her way into the grocery line/ some hotshot from Brooklyn trying to Bogart a game from the regulars
(also bogart a joint) To take more than one’s share, esp of a marijuana cigarette; hog

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    a land-surface depression occupied by waterlogged soil and spongy vegetative material that cannot bear the weight of large animals. Historical Examples Bluebeard Clifton Johnson The Irish Twins Lucy Fitch Perkins The Hound of the Baskervilles A. Conan Doyle The Lake George Moore Fairy Legends and Traditions of The South of Ireland T. Crofton Crocker Sir […]



  • Bog–in

    wet, spongy ground with soil composed mainly of decayed vegetable matter. an area or stretch of such ground. to sink in or as if in a bog (often followed by down): We were bogged down by overwork. bog in, Australian Slang. to eat heartily and ravenously. verb (intransitive, adverb) (Austral & NZ, informal) bogs, bogging, […]

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    a deposit of impure limonite formed in low, wet areas.



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