Very fortunate, as in Peter comes out ahead no matter what he tries; he was born under a lucky star . That stars influence human lives is an ancient idea, and lucky star was used by writers from Shakespeare to the present. The precise phrase appears in a compendium of English idioms compiled by J. Burvenich in 1905. Also see thank one’s lucky stars


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