going or intending to go; on the way to; destined (usually followed by for):
The train is bound for Denver.
Archaic. prepared; ready.
the past tense and past participle of bind
in bonds or chains; tied with or as if with a rope: a bound prisoner
(in combination) restricted; confined: housebound, fogbound
(postpositive, foll by an infinitive) destined; sure; certain: it’s bound to happen
(postpositive) , often foll by by. compelled or obliged to act, behave, or think in a particular way, as by duty, circumstance, or convention
(of a book) secured within a cover or binding: to deliver bound books See also half-bound
(US) (postpositive) , foll by on. resolved; determined: bound on winning

denoting a morpheme, such as the prefix non-, that occurs only as part of another word and not as a separate word in itself Compare free (sense 21)
(in systemic grammar) denoting a clause that has a nonfinite predicator or that is introduced by a binder, and that occurs only together with a freestanding clause Compare freestanding

(logic) (of a variable) occurring within the scope of a quantifier that indicates the degree of generality of the open sentence in which the variable occurs: in (x) (Fx → bxy), x is bound and y is free See free (sense 22)
bound up with, closely or inextricably linked with: his irritability is bound up with his work
I’ll be bound, I am sure (something) is true
to move forwards or make (one’s way) by leaps or jumps
to bounce; spring away from an impact
a jump upwards or forwards
by leaps and bounds, with unexpectedly rapid progess: her condition improved by leaps and bounds
a sudden pronounced sense of excitement: his heart gave a sudden bound when he saw her
a bounce, as of a ball
(transitive) to place restrictions on; limit
when intr, foll by on. to form a boundary of (an area of land or sea, political or administrative region, etc)

a number which is greater than all the members of a set of numbers (an upper bound), or less than all its members (a lower bound) See also bounded (sense 1)
more generally, an element of an ordered set that has the same ordering relation to all the members of a given subset
whence, an estimate of the extent of some set

See bounds

(postpositive) , often foll by for. going or intending to go towards; on the way to: a ship bound for Jamaica, homeward bound
(in combination): northbound traffic

On the way to, heading for. For example, This bus is bound for Broadway. It is also found in a well-known gospel hymn in which the singer is “bound for the land of Canaan.” This phrase stems from the 12th-century meaning of bound as “ready” or “prepared.”

bound and determined to
bound for
bound hand and foot
bound to, be
bound up in


Read Also:

  • Bound-form

    a linguistic form that never occurs by itself but always as part of some larger construction, as -ed in seated. Compare free form (def 2).

  • Bound-hand-and-foot

    Wholly obligated, unable to free oneself. For example, These rules have us bound hand and foot; we can’t even discuss the matter. This term transfers the literal meaning, having one’s hands and feet tied and therefore unable to move, to legal, moral, or social obligations. The expression dates from the 10th century a.d.

  • Bind

    to fasten or secure with a band or bond. to encircle with a band or ligature: She bound her hair with a ribbon. to swathe or bandage (often followed by up): to bind up one’s wounds. to fasten around; fix in place by girding: They bound his hands behind him. to tie up (anything, as […]

  • Bound-to–be

    Be certain or destined to; also, be determined or resolved to. For example, We are bound to hear from them soon, or No matter what they say, she is bound to run for mayor. This usage is derived from the older sense of bound as “obliged.” [ Mid-1500s ]

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