Make something known, as in We suspected that she was pregnant but waited for her to break the news to her in-laws. This term, in slightly different form (break a matter or break a business), dates from the early 1500s. Another variant is the 20th-century journalistic phrase, break a story, meaning “to reveal a news item or make it available for publication.”


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  • Break-the-points

    break the points

  • Break-the-record

    Surpass a previous achievement, as in He was determined to break the record for the high jump. This usage is applied primarily to sports of various kinds. [ 1880s ] Move very fast, as in The lecture was so dull that we broke the record getting to the door: [ Second half of 1900s ]

  • Break–through

    to smash, split, or divide into parts violently; reduce to pieces or fragments: He broke a vase. to infringe, ignore, or act contrary to (a law, rule, promise, etc.): She broke her promise. to dissolve or annul (often followed by off): to break off friendly relations with another country. to fracture a bone of (some […]

  • Breaktime

    the time at or during which a break is taken from work or other activity.

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