Bruce price



Bruce, 1845–1903, U.S. architect.
(Edward) Reynolds, 1933–2011, U.S. novelist.
(Mary) Leontyne
[lee-uh n-teen] /ˈli ənˌtin/ (Show IPA), born 1927, U.S. soprano.
a male given name.
noun
the sum in money or goods for which anything is or may be bought or sold
the cost at which anything is obtained
the cost of bribing a person
a sum of money offered or given as a reward for a capture or killing
value or worth, esp high worth
(gambling) another word for odds
at any price, whatever the price or cost
at a price, at a high price
beyond price, without price, invaluable or priceless
(Irish) the price of someone, what someone deserves, esp a fitting punishment: it’s just the price of him
what price something?, what are the chances of something happening now?
verb (transitive)
to fix or establish the price of
to ascertain or discover the price of
price out of the market, to charge so highly for as to prevent the sale, hire, etc, of
n.

c.1200, pris “value, worth; praise,” later “cost, recompense, prize” (mid-13c.), from Old French pris “price, value, wages, reward,” also “honor, fame, praise, prize” (Modern French prix), from Late Latin precium, from Latin pretium “reward, prize, value, worth,” from PIE *pret-yo-, from root *per- (5) “to traffic in, to sell” (cf. Sanskrit aprata “without recompense, gratuitously;” Greek porne “prostitute,” originally “bought, purchased,” pernanai “to sell;” Lithuanian perku “I buy”).

Praise, price, and prize began to diverge in Old French, with praise emerging in Middle English by early 14c. and prize being evident by late 1500s with the rise of the -z- spelling. Having shed the extra Old French and Middle English senses, the word now again has the base sense of the Latin original. To set (or put) a price on someone, “offer a reward for capture” is from 1766.
v.

“to set the price of,” late 14c., from price (n.) or from Old French prisier, variant of preisier “to value, estimate; to praise.” Related: Priced; pricing.

price is right, the
price on one’s head
price out of the market

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  • B.r.

    bills receivable. Latin Bancus Regis (King’s Bench) Latin Bancus Reginae (Queen’s Bench)

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    Brotherhood of Railway Carmen of America.



  • B.r.c.s.

    British Red Cross Society.

  • B.r.e.

    Bachelor of Religious Education.



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