Caricaturing



a picture, description, etc., ludicrously exaggerating the peculiarities or defects of persons or things:
His caricature of the mayor in this morning’s paper is the best he’s ever drawn.
the art or process of producing such pictures, descriptions, etc.
any imitation or copy so distorted or inferior as to be ludicrous.
to make a caricature of; represent in caricature.
Historical Examples

Perhaps he may have been caricaturing “the ingenious gentleman” of La Mancha.
Romantic Spain John Augustus O’Shea

We wish we were caricaturing instead of representing things as they are.
Natural Law in the Spiritual World Henry Drummond

We may say without exaggeration that it has attained the ne plus ultra of caricaturing as a fine art.
The Catholic World, Vol. X, October 1869 Various

What the deuce do you mean by caricaturing my pictures—hay?’
The Confessions of a Caricaturist, Vol. 1 (of 2) Harry Furniss

And wherever he went he met the fool who was caricaturing him.
In Midsummer Days and Other Tales August Strindberg

Even when he copies, he makes the thing his own by caricaturing it.
The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 20, No. 122, December, 1867 Various

Hopping Jack refrained from caricaturing the preacher, even when he got better.
Into the Highways and Hedges F. F. Montrsor (Frances Frederica)

It is hard that dogma itself should be prejudiced by this caricaturing misuse of its name.
Lux Mundi Various

Genovese, who had sung his duet with Carthagenova so well, was caricaturing himself now that la Tinti was on the stage.
Massimilla Doni Honore de Balzac

I have been accused of caricaturing my acquaintances, but it is untrue.
Notable Women Authors of the Day Helen C. Black

noun
a pictorial, written, or acted representation of a person, which exaggerates his characteristic traits for comic effect
a ludicrously inadequate or inaccurate imitation: he is a caricature of a statesman
verb
(transitive) to represent in caricature or produce a caricature of
n.

1748 (figurative), 1750 (literal), from French caricature (18c.), from Italian caricatura “satirical picture; an exaggeration,” literally “an overloading,” from caricare “to load, exaggerate,” from Vulgar Latin carricare “to load a car” (see charge (v.)). The Italian form had been used in English from 1680s and was common 18c.
v.

1749, from caricature (n.). Related: Caricatured; caricaturing.

In art or literature, portrayal of an individual or thing that exaggerates and distorts prominent characteristics so as to make them appear ridiculous. Caricature is commonly a medium for satire.

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