Cast-iron



made of cast iron.
not subject to change or exception:
a cast-iron rule.
hardy:
a cast-iron stomach.
an alloy of iron, carbon, and other elements, cast as a soft and strong, or as a hard and brittle, iron, depending on the mixture and methods of molding.
Contemporary Examples

Over medium heat, warm up a cast-iron griddle or large skillet; a non-stick griddle or pan will do as well.
Sap Suckers Unite: Recipes for Maple Cookies, Flapjacks, and Cocktails David Lincoln Ross May 2, 2011

Melt the butter in a cast-iron skillet or heavy nonstick sauté pan over medium-high heat.
Dinner Under the Midnight Sun Sophie Menin June 25, 2010

Historical Examples

This cast-iron road was denominated a “plate-way,” from the plate-like form in which the rails were cast.
The Life of George Stephenson and of his Son Robert Stephenson Samuel Smiles

You were so cast-iron certain you could fill his place, you know!
The Dop Doctor Clotilde Inez Mary Graves

First it might be a table or a cupboard, or perhaps a bedstead or a cast-iron cookstove.
Ox-Team Days on the Oregon Trail Ezra Meeker

Each consists of a cast-iron body in which are placed brass collars.
Steam Turbines Hubert E. Collins

For without brotherly love and kindly human interest, laws are but cast-iron rules, and life but a living death.
London’s Underworld Thomas Holmes

It is generally furnished with cast-iron apparatus for cooking.
The Sailor’s Word-Book William Henry Smyth

The carriage runs by means of its cast-iron grooved wheels, upon the cast-iron railway l2, which is fixed level on the floor.
A Dictionary of Arts, Manufactures and Mines Andrew Ure

An oblong mass of cast-iron used for ballast; there are also pigs of lead.
The Sailor’s Word-Book William Henry Smyth

noun
iron containing so much carbon (1.7 to 4.5 per cent) that it cannot be wrought and must be cast into shape
adjective
made of cast iron
rigid, strong, or unyielding: a cast-iron decision
n.

1660s, from cast (past participle adjective) “made by melting and being left to harden in a mold” (1530s), from past participle of cast (v.) in sense “to throw something in a particular way” (c.1300), especially “form metal into a shape by pouring it molten” (1510s). From 1690s as an adjective, cast-iron.

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