Castigate



to criticize or reprimand severely.
to punish in order to correct.
Contemporary Examples

Gingrich also scored points with the media elite that he loves to castigate.
Newt Gingrich Doubles Down in Defending Stance on Illegal Immigration Howard Kurtz November 23, 2011

Matt Bennett, of the Democratic group Third Way, expects Democrats to castigate the Tea Party as “reckless.”
Tea Party’s Next Targets Daniel Stone, Eleanor Clift August 6, 2011

“You can castigate the leaders; you can try and divide us by generation,” he said.
Sharpton Recalls Civil Rights Struggle in DC March Against Police Violence Ben Jacobs December 12, 2014

Historical Examples

I had to castigate one of the ringleaders myself—Herapath by name, claiming kinship with you, by the way.
The Master of the Shell Talbot Baines Reed

The woman grasped a clothes-stick with which she proposed to castigate her niece.
Ruth Fielding Down East Alice B. Emerson

I thought to castigate a libertine, and I have been, I fear, lacerating the heart of a true gentleman!
By Birth a Lady George Manville Fenn

If only I were not a woman, I might castigate you as you deserve!
Juliette Drouet’s Love-Letters to Victor Hugo Louis Guimbaud

I will whip the woman, I mean the child—no, I mean the dog; in fact, I will castigate all three of them.
Paul and His Dog, v.2 (Novels of Paul de Kock Volume XIV) Charles Paul de Kock

Its declared purpose was “simply to instruct the young, reform the old, correct the town, and castigate the age.”
Washington Irving Charles Dudley Warner

The company, or companies, of soldiers will be first detailed for the arduous duties of the field to castigate the Indians.
The Life and Adventures of Kit Carson, the Nestor of the Rocky Mountains, from Facts Narrated by Himself De Witt C. Peters

verb
(transitive) to rebuke or criticize in a severe manner; chastise
v.

c.1600, from Latin castigatus, past participle of castigare “to correct, set right; purify; chastise, punish,” from castus “pure” (see caste) + agere “to do” (see act (n.)). The notion behind the word is “make someone pure by correcting or reproving him.”

If thou didst put this soure cold habit on To castigate thy pride, ’twere well. [Shakespeare, “Timon” IV.iii (1607)]

Related: Castigated; castigating; castigator; castigatory.

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