Catalepsy



a physical condition usually associated with catatonic schizophrenia, characterized by suspension of sensation, muscular rigidity, fixity of posture, and often by loss of contact with environment.
Historical Examples

The case he reports on p. 26, of the woman resuscitated by Rigaudeaux in 1748, was one of catalepsy, if it ever happened.
The Ethics of Medical Homicide and Mutilation Austin O’Malley

Is it the catalepsy in which life is suspended, but consciousness acute?
A Strange Story, Complete Edward Bulwer-Lytton

That is the probable basis for the suggestiveness which we concluded was a prominent factor in catalepsy.
Benign Stupors August Hoch

But even as he spoke he stiffened as a man suddenly struck with catalepsy.
The Proud Prince Justin Huntly McCarthy

It is dreams, swoons, catalepsy, with their allied states which suggest the existence of a double or ghost.
Theism or Atheism Chapman Cohen

At other times he sat hour by hour in a state as motionless as that of catalepsy.
The Philosophy of Disenchantment Edgar Saltus

When not in a catalepsy of literary composition, I am essentially the man of action.
Love Among the Chickens P. G. Wodehouse

Most likely a state of catalepsy, but he was buried and none thought a second time about it.
The Pacific Triangle Sydney Greenbie

Mrs. Dundyke was gazing at him with a fixed, unnatural stare, like one who has been seized with catalepsy.
Mildred Arkell, (Vol 3 of 3) Ellen Wood

Except that I could move and feel, I was like a man fallen in a catalepsy.
Across the Plains Robert Louis Stevenson

noun
a state of prolonged rigid posture, occurring for example in schizophrenia or in hypnotic trances
n.

late 14c., cathalempsia, from Medieval Latin catalepsia, from Late Latin catalepsis, from Greek katalepsis “a seizure, a seizing upon, a taking possession,” from kataleptos “seized,” from katalambanein “to seize upon,” from kata- “down” (see cata-) + lambanein “to take” (see analemma).

catalepsy cat·a·lep·sy (kāt’l-ěp’sē)
n.
A condition that occurs in a variety of physical and psychological disorders and is characterized by lack of response to external stimuli and by muscular rigidity, so that the limbs remain in whatever position they are placed.
cat’a·lep’tic (kāt’l-ěp’tĭk) adj.
cat’a·lep’toid’ adj.

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    a physical condition usually associated with catatonic schizophrenia, characterized by suspension of sensation, muscular rigidity, fixity of posture, and often by loss of contact with environment. noun a state of prolonged rigid posture, occurring for example in schizophrenia or in hypnotic trances n. late 14c., cathalempsia, from Medieval Latin catalepsia, from Late Latin catalepsis, from […]



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