Catalpa



any of several trees constituting the genus Catalpa, of the bignonia family, especially C. speciosa, of the central U.S., or C. bignonioides, of the southern U.S., having opposite, sometimes whorled leaves, clusters of white flowers, and long, beanlike seed pods.
Historical Examples

But then, you see, there was enough saved from the wreckage after all to keep me alive, and Miss catalpa smiled again.
Ruth Fielding Down in Dixie Alice B. Emerson

catalpa is a tree singularly free from destructive diseases.
Seasoning of Wood Joseph B. Wagner

Probably ninety per cent of all the catalpa ever cut has gone into fence posts.
American Forest Trees Henry H. Gibson

I am not the man you knew—except in loving you I am not the man who sat with you beneath the catalpa.
Lewis Rand Mary Johnston

Corolla of catalpa laid open, displaying two good stamens and three abortive ones or vestiges.
The Elements of Botany Asa Gray

The Indian then gently supported him, and seated him against the trunk of the catalpa, at whose foot he had been hitherto lying.
The Prairie Flower Gustave Aimard

How often did she sigh beneath the catalpa, as if anxious to trust the winds with a message of love to other lands!
The Poor Gentleman Hendrik Conscience

These flowers, which resemble the blossom of the catalpa, constitute one of the crests of the Mikado of Japan.
Plant Lore, Legends, and Lyrics Richard Folkard

Steud., is a large tree native of China with the aspect of the catalpa with broad opposite leaves.
Forest Trees of Illinois Fuller George D.

Due to his efforts, and otherwise, catalpa was for a time the most advertised plantation tree in this country.
American Forest Trees Henry H. Gibson

noun
any bignoniaceous tree of the genus Catalpa of North America and Asia, having large leaves, bell-shaped whitish flowers, and long slender pods
n.

c.1740, from an American Indian language of the Carolinas, perhaps Creek (Muskogean) /katalpa/, literally “head-wing.”

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    to act upon by catalysis. verb (transitive) to influence (a chemical reaction) by catalysis v. variant spelling of catalyze (q.v.); for spelling, see -ize. Related: Catalysed; catalysing. v. 1890, back-formation from catalysis on model of analyze/analysis. Related: Catalyzed; catalyzing. Probably influenced by French catalyser (1842). catalyze cat·a·lyze (kāt’l-īz’) v. cat·a·lyzed, cat·a·lyz·ing, cat·a·lyz·es To modify, especially […]



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    to act upon by catalysis. v. 1890, back-formation from catalysis on model of analyze/analysis. Related: Catalyzed; catalyzing. Probably influenced by French catalyser (1842). catalyze cat·a·lyze (kāt’l-īz’) v. cat·a·lyzed, cat·a·lyz·ing, cat·a·lyz·es To modify, especially to increase, the rate of a chemical reaction by catalysis. catalyze (kāt’l-īz’) To modify, especially to increase, the rate of a chemical […]

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    Chemistry. the causing or accelerating of a chemical change by the addition of a catalyst. an action between two or more persons or forces, initiated by an agent that itself remains unaffected by the action: social catalyses occasioned by controversial writings. to act upon by catalysis. noun (pl) -ses (-ˌsiːz) acceleration of a chemical reaction […]



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