Pathology. inflammation of a mucous membrane, especially of the respiratory tract, accompanied by excessive secretions.
Historical Examples

We shall consider the subject therefore under two forms—namely, catarrhal; Erythematous gastritis.
A System of Practical Medicine By American Authors, Vol. II Various

In decoction it is used as an eye-wash in catarrhal conjunctivitis.
The Medicinal Plants of the Philippines T. H. Pardo de Tavera

The fever is not a result of the catarrhal inflammation, nor are the nervous symptoms the result of both the others.
A System of Practical Medicine by American Authors, Vol. I Various

An excellent remedy for bronchitis, colds, and catarrhal coughs.
The Ladies Book of Useful Information Anonymous

The catarrhal symptoms outlast the fever two or three days, but cough and expectoration may not disappear for some time.
A System of Practical Medicine by American Authors, Vol. I Various

It is stimulant, diaphoretic, and expectorant; is used in quinsy, and by the native doctors of Travancore in catarrhal affections.
Cooley’s Cyclopdia of Practical Receipts and Collateral Information in the Arts, Manufactures, Professions, and Trades…, Sixth Edition, Volume I Arnold Cooley

In the nose the sneezing, the discharge, the obstructive swelling suggest at once catarrhal rhinitis.
The Treatment of Hay Fever George Frederick Laidlaw

catarrhal laryngitis, or pseudo-croup, is a feverish disease.
A System of Practical Medicine by American Authors, Vol. I Various

This in its mildest form is catarrhal or erythematous, and is attended only by slight swelling tenderness and salivation.
Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 8, Slice 4 Various

Almost all catarrhal affections of the respiratory organs are due to chills.
The Voice Frank E. Miller

inflammation of a mucous membrane with increased production of mucus, esp affecting the nose and throat in the common cold
the mucus so formed

late 14c., from Medieval Latin catarrus, from Late Latin catarrhus, from Greek katarrhous “a catarrh, a head cold,” literally “a flowing down,” earlier kata rrhoos, ultimately from kata- “down” (see cata-) + rhein “to flow” (see rheum). Related: Catarrhalcatarrhous.

catarrh ca·tarrh (kə-tär’)
Inflammation of mucous membranes, especially of the nose and throat.
ca·tarrh’al adj.


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